Personality Dimensions®: We’re Big In Japan

A group of non-Japanese-engineers, who had never worked at client-oriented services, joined together and found out how insightful it is to discover one’s uniqueness in Japan! While they are colleagues, they work independently and don’t communicate much in the workplace. They worked on several different teams. Every day they follow a set schedule and deal with machining work individually. Their desire to pave a new career path brought them to Japan to work at a Japanese engineering company.

People are impressed by the Japanese work culture. There is a great deal of attention to detail, schedules are tightly maintained and there are frequent checks to ensure that they are responsible. The high quality of products made in Japan and service here is always being appreciated. Yet, in the background, there are exceptions, as shown in these participant comments.

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“Finally I realize why I easily get mad with the workplace and the leaders! They just don’t follow the manual which originally a good guide to preventing mistakes but they just don’t follow it! Even the leaders don’t do so! Everyone just takes the tools and put them on the table but not back on the corner of the table for the tools! That really puts me under stress.” said an Organized Gold engineer.

“I was so depressed when they kept asking me to find the root cause of the incidents. I explained, but they asked me to keep asking myself Why.” said a Resourceful Orange participant.

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Japanese companies always emphasize the sense of “collective” but not the individual.

They view Teamwork as having a team goal only and do not always look into the strengths and weakness of the individual, especially when placing someone in a position to raise productivity. They view Communication as the report related to the work between each process, but not as providing ways for sharing opinions from the bottom to the top. The deep collectivist working culture makes employees hesitate to express their thoughts and they may feel very guilty when human mistakes occur. This confuses foreign employees to a large extent.

“I found it’s not the REAL me now. I owned a company in my country and I took a lot of effort on the various tasks for my business. I really hate repeating the same work.” said a Resourceful Orange engineer.

“Okay, now I understand why you just told me “Okay,” and seemed unwilling to answer me any more questions when I asked if your leg was okay after the accident.” “Yes, I just wanted to stay alone and not to get any attention as I made a very loud noise when the product dropped.” An Inquiring Green and introverted engineer replied to the extravert.

“I learned how each person is unique from the other, how they behave and what makes me annoyed.” said an Authentic Blue engineer.

Quote from Aristotle, “Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.” We hope that this small step of Personality Dimensions® entering Japanese societies will bring a new insight into human resources management and gain more popularity in Japan.

“I’ve always wanted to do such a personality assessment. I think our company should actually have something like this!” said a Pilipino engineer who has worked for over 5 years in same the company.

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Lok Cheung, Director of Always Alive Workshop, Registered Social Worker, Personality Dimensions® Facilitator (Level I)

Living abroad in Japan. Proficient in Cantonese, English, Mandarin, Korean. Working hard on Spanish and Japanese.

Personality Dimensions® Statistics

PD-Stats-beachThis year we told The PD Stats Robot (patent still pending) that he couldn’t go on his vacation until he published the yearly Personality Dimensions® statistics. Working diligently with his eye on the prize, he churned out this year’s report.

Once again The PD Stats Robot and the rest of the staff at CLSR Inc. would like to thank all of the Certified Trainers who took the time to send in their workshop statistics over the past year.  Collecting workshop statistics allows us to do further research on the reliability and validity of Personality Dimensions®.  If you look at the Primary Colour Breakdowns over the past 14 years, you will notice very little change with them over time; In fact, there is no change from last year and the year before in the percentage breakdowns. How’s that for reliability?!?! Full statistics for the Canadian market, including this year’s, are published every year in July and are posted at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/published-statistics

Collecting workshop statistics also helps us in creating new products.  For example, the job categories found in Career Dimensions™ were taken directly from the statistics reported to us by Certified Trainers. Your statistics also helped us in developing the recently released PD for Youth Online™, and PD Basics Online.

We ask that every time you conduct an Introductory or Application Session, even if you had your clients take the assessment online,  that you keep track of your participants’ Primary Colour Preference, and Introversion/Extraversion preference.  You can find a form on the USB included with your Building Blocks/Manual to do this.  Statistics can then be faxed to 905-760-0113, or emailed to stats@clsr.ca.  You can also submit your statistics through the web at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/submit-your-statistics.

Once received at our office, our PD Stats Robot (patent still pending) diligently processes and categorizes every number and colour submitted!  Also, remember to submit your statistics even if you are administering Personality Dimensions® Online.  Remember that the assessment component isn’t the final word on an individual’s primary colour, especially if scores are close; clarification also comes from the Brightening Group exercises in a workshop.

Until next time, join us in wishing PD Stats Robot (patent still pending) safe travels and a relaxing vacation.

Personality Dimensions® – It’s All About Communication

We were talking about the early days of working with Personality Dimensions® at the office earlier today – okay, I was talking, the others were listening; they’re all from the next generation – and it reminded me of one presentation that really stands out in my memory and that has helped shape Personality Dimensions® in some ways.

I had been invited to speak at a gathering of leaders for a youth organization. There were leaders from all over southern Ontario present, a hundred or so if memory serves, including from their headquarters. I’d been given an hour or two to do to an introduction to temperament theory/Personality Dimensions® and I included an emphasis on interpersonal communications.

The lovely ladies (it was all ladies present) who volunteered their time and talents to the youth in their units all seemed to be really interested and a lot of discussion took place. The room was, to my eye, largely a sea of blue, and I’m not just talking about the uniforms. Sitting at the front, clustered around one large table were the leaders from headquarters – a very Organized Gold group, with some Authentic Blue and one Inquiring Green. Everyone, regardless of their plaid, was there because they wanted to do the very best job that they could for the kids.

anna-earl-1679846-unsplashI did the presentation and it was well received so I started to pack up and prepare for my 4 hour drive home. It took me another 2 hours to get out the door! Foregoing the break that was planned immediately after my presentation, many of the ladies gathered around to help me – and to talk about how my presentation applied to them specifically. While some talked about their kids or spouses and how they now recognized why they didn’t always see eye to eye – the usual reaction people have after they’ve been introduced to Personality Dimensions® – many wanted to talk about the actual organization. It seems that there had been some problems between headquarters and many of the leaders. Some were actually in tears (in case you don’t know me, I’m a bright Inquiring Green; tears can be a bit of a challenge for me to deal with so to say I was surprised at this reaction to my presentation would be quite the understatement)!

It quickly became clear that changes were being made to the program at the top level but no one was actually explaining why. Keep in mind that many of the ladies had been volunteering for several years, often starting when their own child wanted to join and a new leader was needed to keep the group going and then staying on long afterwards to continue to give to the next groups. They were hurt and felt a bit resentful. Now they understood a bit more about the differences in communication styles for each colour; it wasn’t personal, and was never intended to be.

I got home a bit later than I’d planned to that evening but the whole event left quite an impression on me – obviously; it took place almost two decades ago and I’m telling you about it now. If we are able, as Personality Dimensions® facilitators, to give those who we have the opportunity to speak with a greater sense of self-respect and understanding for others and in the process allow them to see the differences in communication styles for each colour – and fill in any missing gaps – we will have done a great thing!

 

Yours, from the back office.

Denise

Denise Hughes is the Director and owner of Denise HeadshotCLSR Inc. and general editor of Personality Dimensions® materials and products. She just noticed the calendar and realized it is just past the 44th anniversary of her introduction to career and type and temperament materials. Those experiences and the expertise she gained through her years with the Guidance Centre, University of Toronto, and now with CLSR, continue to shape the direction that both CLSR and Personality Dimensions® take.

Personality Dimensions® for Youth Foundations

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As many Personality Dimensions® facilitators are aware, we have an ongoing commitment to continuous research and development of Personality Dimensions® materials. For the last year or so we’ve focussed that commitment on recognizing the diverse needs of the youth population and developing materials that support the very timely and much needed Youth Employment initiatives across the country.

Following extensive beta testing this past Fall – with our sincere thanks to all who participated – it’s my real pleasure to announce that the PD for Youth™ online assessment is now available! The accompanying PD for Youth Foundations™ Facilitators Guide will be available on February 26th.

Want to take a test drive of the PD for Youth™ online assessment? Email or call us, and we’ll be delighted to provide you with a complimentary credit on your online account.

What makes the PD for Youth™ online assessment and Foundations Facilitator Guide unique is that they were designed for youth in youth employment and/or career development settings. Unlike the classic materials, PD for Youth™ is tailored to suit the needs and experiences of this age group, encouraging them to explore their values, how they see themselves while learning, with their friends and family and in the world of work. Facilitators can adapt the content of the Foundations guide to suit the direction and time frame that they need to work effectively with their youth group.

In addition to leading your participants through an introductory Personality Dimensions® workshop, the Foundations Guide also walks you through a career building application workshop.

Activities include:

  • Identifying key strengths brought to the workplace by each colour
  • Preparing for an informational interview
  • Exploring job search methods

Handouts and PowerPoint® presentation for both the introductory session as well as the career building workshop are all included. The PD for Youth Foundations™ Facilitators Guide is packaged onto a USB drive for portability and easy access on current technology.

I can’t speak for anyone else, of course, but I am personally delighted to be able to bring these great, immediately useful resources to you.

Yours, from the back office.

~Denise

Denise Hughes is the Director and owner of Denise HeadshotCLSR Inc. and general editor of Personality Dimensions® materials and products. She just noticed the calendar and realized it is just past the 44th anniversary of her introduction to career and type and temperament materials. Those experiences and the expertise she gained through her years with the Guidance Centre, University of Toronto, and now with CLSR, continue to shape the direction that both CLSR and Personality Dimensions® take.

Personality Dimensions® Statistics

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PD Stats Robot (Patent Pending)

The PD Stats Robot (patent still pending) got out of his storage closet… I mean office…  and took an early vacation before crunching a year’s worth of Personality Dimensions® workshop statistics, so this year’s published statistics are a little later than usual.  The PD Stats Robot and the rest of the staff at CLSR Inc. would like to thank all of the Certified Trainers who took the time to send in their workshop statistics over the past year.  Collecting workshop statistics allows us to do further research on the reliability and validity of Personality Dimensions®.  If you look at the Primary Colour Breakdowns over the past 13 years, you will notice very little change with them over time; In fact, there is no change over last year’s percentage breakdowns.  Full statistics for the Canadian market, including this year’s are published every year in July and are posted at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/published-statistics

Collecting workshop statistics also helps us in creating new products.  For example, the job categories found in Career Dimensions™ were taken directly from the statistics reported to us by Certified Trainers. Your statistics also helped us in developing the upcoming PD for Youth Online™, and a few other things that will be announced in the coming months.

We ask that every time you conduct an Introductory or Application Session, even if you had your clients take the assessment online,  that your keep track of your participants’ Primary Colour Preference, and Introversion/Extraversion preference.  You can find a form on the disk included with your Building Blocks/Manual to do this.  Statistics can then be faxed in to 905-760-0113, or emailed to stats@clsr.ca.  You can also submit your statistics through the web at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/submit-your-statistics.

Once received at our office, our PD Stats Robot (patent still pending) diligently processes and categorizes every number and colour submitted!  Also remember to submit your statistics even if you are administering Personality Dimensions® Online.  Remember that the assessment component isn’t the final word on an individual’s primary colour, especially if scores are close; clarification also comes from the Brightening Group exercises in a workshop.

Personality Dimensions® – Core, Developed, and Contextual Self

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Image © Linda Berens

Every once in a while someone will ask if it’s possible to identify the colour preference of  children, or if their preference carries through to adulthood. We haven’t done specific research on this but it is accepted temperament theory that children are clear in their colour preference and that it develops as they mature – the Core Self becomes the Developed Self and Contextual Self (thanks to Linda Berens for these terrific identifiers). Well, I can’t speak for other people but I’d like to tell you a couple of stories from my own childhood that illustrate my first colour preference has certainly remained consistent.

 

I am the oldest child in my family. My Dad had a sliver grey ‘58 Pontiac sedan that he kept in top running condition. And I spent hours leaning over the side of the hood watching what he was doing and driving him crazy with questions about how everything worked. My kindergarten teacher even remarked to my parents at one time that she thought I could build the car myself. To this day I am still fascinated by how things work.

When I was 7 years old my Dad took my cousin and I to see the circus. That was a huge treat at the time (remember, that was over 55 years ago; circuses were a very big deal). I was fascinated by the whole thing –- the performances, the music, the animals – and all the special lighting effects and how the trapezes and draperies, etc., were raised and lowered. The next evening during dinner my Mother and Father were talking about the show and I was so surprised to hear my Dad say, “I don’t think Denise saw any of the show, she was so busy looking up, watching whatever was going on in the rafters.” I was stunned. Of course I had seen the show! But I’d also enjoyed figuring out how all the other things were working – eventually estimating, by the timing of the lights or the change in backdrop or draperies when something else was going to happen (it’s actually still quite clear in my mind). Fascinating stuff to a 7 year old, or, at least, a 7 year old Inquiring Green. My parents must have wondered what made me tick from time to time.

Now it’s your turn. I’d love to hear your stories about you as a child. Do you see yourself as representing your first colour preference/temperament as a child? I hope you will share some of  your “colourful” stories.

 

Onward and upward from the back office … Denise

Denise Hughes is the Director and owner of Denise HeadshotCareer/LifeSkills Resources Inc. and general editor of Personality Dimensions® materials and products. She just noticed the calendar and realized it is just past the 42nd anniversary of her introduction to career and type and temperament materials. Those experiences and the expertise she gained through her years with the Guidance Centre, University of Toronto, and now with CLSR, continue to shape the direction that both Career/LifeSkills Resources and Personality Dimensions® take.

Personality Dimensions® Word Definitions

Personality Dimensions® is all about creating a common language of understanding; but how can you have a common language of understanding if you don’t understand the language?  To help solve this, we created the following list way back in 2002 when Personality Dimensions® was still going through its focus group testing phase.  As a Certified Trainer you probably have seen this before on page 95 in your copy of Building Blocks to a Personality Dimensions Introductory Workshop, 2nd Edition.  We have found that this handout is especially useful when delivering a workshop using PD Basics materials, as well as PD @ School, and PD for Youth.  Do you think this list covers it all, or are there other terms we should add to it?  Let us know in the comments below.

 

Abstract – something not clear or concrete (see concepts and theories)

Accommodating – flexible; cooperative; willing to please

Accomplishments – things you have done or achieved; goals reached

Accordingly – to meet the situation; to be appropriate

Acknowledging – pointing out; calling attention to; recognizing

Advocate – one who stands up or fights for others; a supporter

Aloof – snobbish; unfriendly; distant; cold

Analyzing – looking at something closely; investigating it and figuring it out

Authentic – true; real; genuine

Authority – boss; in charge or control; rule-maker

Betrayed – cheated; lied; been disloyal

Charismatic – warm; likeable; charming; able to get people to like you

Clarify – make clearly understood

Committed – devoted to; promised to; secure in

Compassionate – caring; supportive; kind, warm; sympathetic

Compelled – to feel obligated or forced to do something by a feeling inside us

Competence – skilled in, or good at something

Competitive – meeting challenges from others; compete; go against

Complex – difficult; detailed; puzzling

Compromise – an agreement that pleases everyone and usually requires some giving in on both parts

Concepts – idea; theory; view; something not concrete

Concise – brief and to the point

Contributions – things we give – time, money, ideas, labour, etc.

Convincing – able to bring people to your way of thinking

Debate – a friendly argument; discussing two different sides of an issue

Dedication – loyalty; commitment; sticking with it

Democratic – a process where everyone’s opinion is heard and considered

Empathetic – understanding how someone else feels

Ensuring – making sure that

Enthusiastically – with a lot of energy, excitement and a positive feeling

Entrepreneurial – interested in and capable of running your own business

Ethics – knowing right from wrong and choosing to do right; morals; standards

Generous – very giving; likes to give lots of things to others

Global View – a big picture view; not specific or detailed

Impact – having an effect or making a difference

Implicit – something that doesn’t need to be said; it is clearly implied or hinted at Impulsive acting quickly on a gut feeling

Innate – in-born; something that you were born with; that comes naturally

Innovation – fresh; new; original ideas Insensitive not aware of or worried about others’ feelings

Intellect – brain, mind or understanding

Interactive – communication and action between two or more people Intuition a feeling that leads to an idea, a hunch, an instinct

Life-long Learner – one who takes courses or learns new things on their own all their life

Mediator – one who helps others solve problems without taking sides; a peacemaker

Meticulous – very careful, neat and exact; looking out for important details

Minimal – as little or few as possible

Modifications – slight or minor changes to something

Motivator – one who can encourage and excite others to carry on

Multi-tasker – one who does a lot of things at the same time, or jumps back and forth easily between different tasks

Mutual Respect – people respect each other; I respect you and you respect me

Negotiator – one who is good at getting the best deal, or reaching the best solution by talking and bargaining

Objective – fair; neutral; not taking sides

Optimistic – look on the bright side or look for positive things

Passionately – with a lot of strong feeling and excitement

Perpetual – constant; endless; ongoing

Persuasive – able to make people agree with your ideas or opinions

Potential – possible; promising skill or talent not yet developed

Practicality – sensible usefulness or benefit

Precise – exact; accurate

Principled – follow a strict guide to moral behaviour; do the right thing

Procedures – a guideline for how things should be done

Rationale – the reason behind something; “why” it is

Redundancy – unnecessary routine or repetitiveness; repeating the same thing again and again; repeating the same thing again and again

Resourceful – having good ideas for using what is available or getting what is needed

Restrictive – too many rules, limits, or boundaries

Revel – really enjoy; delight in

Security – feeling safe and stable

Self Actualization – being the best that you can possibly be; being your idea of perfect

Semantics – differences between very specific meanings of words and phrases

Sensitive – easily pick up unspoken messages from others and interpret the meaning

Sentimental – warm, touching feelings; having great meaning for you

Solitary – alone; by one’s self

Spontaneous – do quickly without thinking it through; acting on impulse

Tactile – touching; hands-on; physical

Tangents – things not related to the topic being discussed

Tenacious – stubborn; determined; insistent

Theories – ideas not based on solid facts

Trustworthy – honest; able to live up to the trust others put in you

Unique – one of a kind; special; not like all the others

Visionary – one who has good ideas about how things could be in the future