Introverts and Extraverts Come in the Same Four Delicious Varieties

Photo by Sarah Gualtieri on Unsplash

A couple of months ago I promised to follow up the blog on Introverts with its flip side on Extraverts.  It was a refreshing dip back into the “Splash” pool (a mere 10 years after the release of my first book, Splash, An Introvert’s Guide to Being Seen, Heard and Remembered).  And within it, a big shout out to Personality Dimensions®, and its fabulous feature of acknowledging and exploring the expressions and experiences of those with preferences for Introversion and Extraversion within each of the four temperaments.

I’m going to start this offering with a refresh on the general differences between Introverts and Extraverts, and then dig in a little deeper for Extraversion within each Personality Dimensions® colour.

NB:  I am shamelessly borrowing and building on excellent content from the soon-to-be-released-and available-for-your-use Personality Dimensions® Wellness Report.

IntrovertsExtraverts
Tend to think inside their heads, and not express an idea until it is “fully cooked”Tend to think out loud and express ideas as they come to them
Learn and problem solve best when they have the time for quiet reflectionLearn and problem solve best when they have the opportunity to interact with others
Are seen as quiet and calmAre seen as outgoing
Generally operate at a moderate, calm paceLike to be active and move at a fast pace
Have an intimate circle of those they call true friendsHave a broad circle of people they call friends
Think first, then talk, then think some moreTalk first, then think, then talk some more

So now let’s focus in on the Extraverts’ side of things and look at how they tend to show up within each colour …

The Resourceful Orange Extravert:

It’s all about FREEDOM! These folks are most at home in the concrete world; with things that can be seen, touched and used.  They have keen senses, love working with their hands, are born for action, and for making free, spontaneous manoeuvres that get quick, effective results.  They have a natural talent for the arts, are comfortable with risk, and often have “action/doing” type careers such as salespeople, paramedics, pilots, craftsmen.  Life is to be enjoyed!

Core Psychological Needs:  Freedom to act on the needs of the moment, the ability to make an impact now, to have control over how they operate.

Strengths: Seeing and seizing an opportunity, reading people and situations, adapting to the circumstances, persuasive, managing a crisis, creating options and solutions.

Stressors:  Rigidly enforced rules, routine and boredom, negativity, not being in control, no fun.

People who misunderstand me might say I’m:  rebellious, rambunctious, class clown, careless, no follow-through, risk taker, can’t sit still.

The Inquiring Green Extravert

It’s all about COMPETENCE! This gang gives much importance to intellect and proficiency.  They thirst for knowledge, and seek to know the foundations and principles behind why things are as they are and how things work.  They work tirelessly, and pride themselves on the ingenuity they bring to their work.  They have high standards for themselves and others. They are the engineers, the professors, the scientists, the mechanics and the systems people.

Core Psychological Needs:  Knowledge and competence, mastery, to be seen as an expert in their field.

Talents:  Logical reasoning, systematizing, inventing, envisioning multiple possible scenarios, abstract thought, long-term thinking, solving complex problems.

Stressors:  Powerlessness, incompetence, redundancy, mindless chit chat, rigid routine environments.

People who misunderstand me might stay I’m:  sceptical, arrogant, need to be right, insensitive, impatient, without social EQ.

The Authentic Blue Extravert

It’s all about RELATIONSHIPS! These individuals are passionate about personal growth, and nurturing harmonious relationships.  They believe that life is full of unknown possibilities and untapped potentials.  Highly ethical in their actions, they hold themselves to a strict standard of personal integrity.  They are filled with kindness; and they cherish warm intimate friendships.  They gravitate to jobs such as counsellors, teachers, ministers and advocates.

Core Psychological Needs:  Self-actualization, finding meaning and significance, unique identity.

Talents:  Empathy, seeing and developing potential in others, generating possibilities, identifying ethical issues, advocating for causes or others, diplomacy, communication, creating harmony.

Stressors:  Conflict, insincerity, betrayal, lack of integrity, no room for innovation, inauthentic behaviour, unfairness, superficiality, intense competition.

People who misunderstand me might stay I’m:  too soft, overly sensitive, overly helpful, not focussed enough on task, emotional.

The Organized Gold Extravert

It’s all about SECURITY and belonging! These are sensible, down-to-earth people who excel at precision and attention to detail.  They believe in following the rules and cooperating with authorities.  They are careful about schedules, cautious about change, and take pride in being trustworthy, hardworking and reliable.  You’ll often find them in nursing, teaching, accounting, management, administration and police work. They are comfortable and competent in leadership roles.

Core Psychological Needs:  Responsibility, duty, sense of belonging, caring for others.

Talents:  Supervising and monitoring, providing for others’ needs, warning of danger, developing policy and procedures, maintaining and passing on traditions, making decisions.

Stressors:  Disorganization, lack of discipline, abrupt change in plan, irresponsibility, people who are not prepared, tardiness, lack of adherence to rules.

People who misunderstand me might stay I’m:  too rigid, judgmental, inflexible, all work no play, critical, pessimistic, demanding.

The Good News, Once Again

The good news is that, as different as Introverts and Extraverts are, they both come in the same four varieties.  So they share many behavioural similarities! 

For me, the recognition that “it’s not personal, it’s personality” has provided freedom, acceptance, understanding and effectiveness to my dealing with people; professionally and personally.  I hope this awareness does the same for you.

Carole 60

Carole Cameron is an accomplished speaker, facilitator, coach and author with over 25 years’ experience helping organizations, individuals and teams maximize their personal and professional effectiveness.  Carole is recognized for creating powerful and memorable learning experiences, and for making more than a little room for humour and fun.

Look for an all new 2nd edition of Splash, An Introvert’s Guide to Being Seen, Heard and Remembered coming later this year in print and Kindle versions.

Also coming in September 2020: the Personality Dimensions® Wellness Report empowers each of the four colours to improve their well being through six wellness factors. All Certified Personality Dimensions® will be able to access this new report in your CLSRassessments.com account.

Introverts and Extraverts Come in the Same Four Delicious Varieties

An astonishing 10 years have gone by since the release of my first book, Sp!ash, An Introvert’s Guide to Being Seen, Heard and Remembered.  Within it, I incorporated the elements of Personality Dimensions®, one of the most widely used tools in the area of self-awareness and temperament theory.  One of the most fabulous, useful and differentiating features of Personality Dimensions® is that it acknowledges and explores the important and contrasting expressions and experience of those with preferences for Introversion and Extraversion within each of the four temperaments.

I thought it was time to jump back into that pool for a refreshing dip!  This post begins that exploration on the Introverts’ side of things.  Of course.  The next instalment will give the Extraverts their turn.

 

The Resourceful Orange Introvert

These folks are most at home in the concrete world; with things that can be seen, touched and used.  They have keen senses, love working with their hands, are born for action, and for making free, spontaneous manoeuvres that get quick, effective results.  They have a natural talent for the arts, are comfortable with risk, and often have “action/doing” type careers such as salespeople, paramedics, pilots, craftsmen.

Core Psychological Needs:  Freedom to act on the needs of the moment, the ability to make an impact now

Talents: Seeing and seizing an opportunity, adapting to the circumstances, troubleshooting, pragmatic problem solving, managing a crisis, creating options

Stressors:  Constraint, boredom, no opportunity to make an impact

When I’m out of energy:  Can display a “don’t mess with me” attitude

As an Introvert, I sometimes feel like I’m missing out on:  Opportunities to do things or have fun.

 

The Inquiring Green Introvert

This gang gives much importance to intellect and proficiency.  They thirst for knowledge, and seek to know the foundations and principles behind why things are as they are and how things work.  They work tirelessly, and pride themselves on the ingenuity they bring to their work.  They are the engineers, the professors, the scientists, and the systems people.

Core Psychological Needs:  Knowledge and competence, mastery and self-control

Talents:  Strategy, systematizing, inventing, envisioning multiple possible scenarios, using words precisely, classifying, abstract thought, long-term thinking

Stressors:  Powerlessness, incompetence, redundancy, lack of knowledge

When I’m out of energy:  May become intolerant and impatient.  “I’m surrounded by idiots”

As an Introvert, I sometimes feel like I’m missing out on:  Being seen as knowledgeable or competent

 

The Authentic Blue Introvert

These individuals are passionate about personal growth, and in nurturing harmonious relationships.  They believe that life is full of unknown possibilities and untapped potentials.  Highly ethical in their actions, they hold themselves to a strict standard of personal integrity.  They are filled with kindness; and they cherish warm intimate friendships.  They gravitate to jobs such as counsellors, teachers, ministers and advocates.

Core Psychological Needs:  Meaning and significance, unique identity and purpose

Talents:  Diplomacy, empathy, seeing and developing potential in others, imagining better futures, seeing ethical issues, advocating for causes or others

Stressors:  Insincerity, betrayal, lack of integrity

When I’m out of energy:  Can become down, less optimistic and idealistic, can appear “plastic”, like faking concern for others

As an Introvert, I sometimes feel like I’m missing out on:  Quality and depth of relationships

 

The Organized Gold Introvert

These are sensible, down-to-earth people who are the backbone of institutions and society.  They believe in following the rules and cooperating with authorities.  They are careful about schedules, cautious about change, and take pride in being trustworthy, hardworking and reliable.  You’ll often find them in nursing, teaching, accounting, management, administration and police work.

Core Psychological Needs:  Responsibility, duty, sense of belonging, caring for others

Talents:  Logistics, supervising and monitoring, measuring, providing for others’ needs, warning of danger, developing policy and procedures, maintaining and passing on traditions

Stressors:  Abandonment, lack of discipline, insubordination, irresponsibility

When I’m out of energy:  May withdraw from responsibility, complain, sigh

As an Introvert I sometimes feel like I’m missing out on: being appreciated and acknowledged for all that I do

 

The Good News!

The good news is that, as different as Introverts and Extraverts are, they both come in the same four varieties.  So they share many behavioural similarities!  Stay tuned for the Extraverted flip side!

If you are an Extravert, and would like to be a part of the next article, please forward me your primary and secondary Personality Dimensions® colours if you know them, along with brief answers to the following questions…

  • Core Needs and Values:
  • Talents and Strengths:
  • Stressors:
  • When I’m out of energy/not at my best/:
  • As an extravert, I sometimes feel like I’m missing out on/messing up with:

I’d love to hear from you! carole@make-a-splash.ca

 

Carole 60Carole Cameron is an accomplished speaker, facilitator, coach and author with over 25 years’ experience helping organizations, individuals and teams maximize their personal and professional effectiveness.  Carole is recognized for creating powerful and memorable learning experiences, and for making more than a little room for humour and fun.

Personality Dimensions® – It’s All About Communication

We were talking about the early days of working with Personality Dimensions® at the office earlier today – okay, I was talking, the others were listening; they’re all from the next generation – and it reminded me of one presentation that really stands out in my memory and that has helped shape Personality Dimensions® in some ways.

I had been invited to speak at a gathering of leaders for a youth organization. There were leaders from all over southern Ontario present, a hundred or so if memory serves, including from their headquarters. I’d been given an hour or two to do to an introduction to temperament theory/Personality Dimensions® and I included an emphasis on interpersonal communications.

The lovely ladies (it was all ladies present) who volunteered their time and talents to the youth in their units all seemed to be really interested and a lot of discussion took place. The room was, to my eye, largely a sea of blue, and I’m not just talking about the uniforms. Sitting at the front, clustered around one large table were the leaders from headquarters – a very Organized Gold group, with some Authentic Blue and one Inquiring Green. Everyone, regardless of their plaid, was there because they wanted to do the very best job that they could for the kids.

anna-earl-1679846-unsplashI did the presentation and it was well received so I started to pack up and prepare for my 4 hour drive home. It took me another 2 hours to get out the door! Foregoing the break that was planned immediately after my presentation, many of the ladies gathered around to help me – and to talk about how my presentation applied to them specifically. While some talked about their kids or spouses and how they now recognized why they didn’t always see eye to eye – the usual reaction people have after they’ve been introduced to Personality Dimensions® – many wanted to talk about the actual organization. It seems that there had been some problems between headquarters and many of the leaders. Some were actually in tears (in case you don’t know me, I’m a bright Inquiring Green; tears can be a bit of a challenge for me to deal with so to say I was surprised at this reaction to my presentation would be quite the understatement)!

It quickly became clear that changes were being made to the program at the top level but no one was actually explaining why. Keep in mind that many of the ladies had been volunteering for several years, often starting when their own child wanted to join and a new leader was needed to keep the group going and then staying on long afterwards to continue to give to the next groups. They were hurt and felt a bit resentful. Now they understood a bit more about the differences in communication styles for each colour; it wasn’t personal, and was never intended to be.

I got home a bit later than I’d planned to that evening but the whole event left quite an impression on me – obviously; it took place almost two decades ago and I’m telling you about it now. If we are able, as Personality Dimensions® facilitators, to give those who we have the opportunity to speak with a greater sense of self-respect and understanding for others and in the process allow them to see the differences in communication styles for each colour – and fill in any missing gaps – we will have done a great thing!

 

Yours, from the back office.

Denise

Denise Hughes is the Director and owner of Denise HeadshotCLSR Inc. and general editor of Personality Dimensions® materials and products. She just noticed the calendar and realized it is just past the 44th anniversary of her introduction to career and type and temperament materials. Those experiences and the expertise she gained through her years with the Guidance Centre, University of Toronto, and now with CLSR, continue to shape the direction that both CLSR and Personality Dimensions® take.

Personality Dimensions® Colourful Strengths

The power of Personality Dimensions® is in the whole experience; it is part assessment and part self-discovery process.  After individuals complete their assessments, they get to work with others with the same Dimensions to help clarify and reinforce their results.  One of the first questions groups are asked to answer is “what are your natural strengths?”  Since launching in 2004, hundreds of thousands of people have experienced a Personality Dimensions® Introductory Session. With all these people you would think that there would be a huge number of different answers to this question, but in fact we keep seeing the same ones over and over again.  So here it is… the top 10 strengths each of the four Personality Dimensions® see in themselves…

PD-Strengths

 

It’s great that these same responses keep coming up over and over again, but what happens if you are facilitating a group, and you are missing representation from one of the Dimensions?  It can easily happen; statistically there are fewer Inquiring Greens and Resourceful Oranges than there are Authentic Blues and Organized Golds.  Knowing this could be a challenge, especially to new Personality Dimensions® Trainers, we created Phantom Groups – Virtual Flip-Charts for Personality Dimensions® Brightened Groups.  Phantom Groups are, simply, sample representative flip-charts from previous groups.

 

The flip-charts selected to appear in Phantom Groups are reproductions of actual flip-charts created by Personality Dimensions® groups over an eight year period. They are typical representations, not tailored to any special groups, just as you would expect to be generated at an introductory workshop. The contents are an accurate reproduction of what each group contributed, using computer graphics to make them easier to read.  Lynda McKim, who compiled the Phantom Groups charts, saved these and carried them with her to each Introductory Workshop, just in case she needed them.  Now, instead of carrying an awkward mailing tube, with flip-chart papers, you only need the Phantom Groups disc in your toolbox.