Personality Dimensions®: We’re Big In Japan

A group of non-Japanese-engineers, who had never worked at client-oriented services, joined together and found out how insightful it is to discover one’s uniqueness in Japan! While they are colleagues, they work independently and don’t communicate much in the workplace. They worked on several different teams. Every day they follow a set schedule and deal with machining work individually. Their desire to pave a new career path brought them to Japan to work at a Japanese engineering company.

People are impressed by the Japanese work culture. There is a great deal of attention to detail, schedules are tightly maintained and there are frequent checks to ensure that they are responsible. The high quality of products made in Japan and service here is always being appreciated. Yet, in the background, there are exceptions, as shown in these participant comments.

IMG_3177.png

“Finally I realize why I easily get mad with the workplace and the leaders! They just don’t follow the manual which originally a good guide to preventing mistakes but they just don’t follow it! Even the leaders don’t do so! Everyone just takes the tools and put them on the table but not back on the corner of the table for the tools! That really puts me under stress.” said an Organized Gold engineer.

“I was so depressed when they kept asking me to find the root cause of the incidents. I explained, but they asked me to keep asking myself Why.” said a Resourceful Orange participant.

IMG_3308.png

Japanese companies always emphasize the sense of “collective” but not the individual.

They view Teamwork as having a team goal only and do not always look into the strengths and weakness of the individual, especially when placing someone in a position to raise productivity. They view Communication as the report related to the work between each process, but not as providing ways for sharing opinions from the bottom to the top. The deep collectivist working culture makes employees hesitate to express their thoughts and they may feel very guilty when human mistakes occur. This confuses foreign employees to a large extent.

“I found it’s not the REAL me now. I owned a company in my country and I took a lot of effort on the various tasks for my business. I really hate repeating the same work.” said a Resourceful Orange engineer.

“Okay, now I understand why you just told me “Okay,” and seemed unwilling to answer me any more questions when I asked if your leg was okay after the accident.” “Yes, I just wanted to stay alone and not to get any attention as I made a very loud noise when the product dropped.” An Inquiring Green and introverted engineer replied to the extravert.

“I learned how each person is unique from the other, how they behave and what makes me annoyed.” said an Authentic Blue engineer.

Quote from Aristotle, “Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.” We hope that this small step of Personality Dimensions® entering Japanese societies will bring a new insight into human resources management and gain more popularity in Japan.

“I’ve always wanted to do such a personality assessment. I think our company should actually have something like this!” said a Pilipino engineer who has worked for over 5 years in same the company.

20150105_170015-1-1.jpeg

Lok Cheung, Director of Always Alive Workshop, Registered Social Worker, Personality Dimensions® Facilitator (Level I)

Living abroad in Japan. Proficient in Cantonese, English, Mandarin, Korean. Working hard on Spanish and Japanese.

Personality Dimensions® Statistics

PD-Stats-beachThis year we told The PD Stats Robot (patent still pending) that he couldn’t go on his vacation until he published the yearly Personality Dimensions® statistics. Working diligently with his eye on the prize, he churned out this year’s report.

Once again The PD Stats Robot and the rest of the staff at CLSR Inc. would like to thank all of the Certified Trainers who took the time to send in their workshop statistics over the past year.  Collecting workshop statistics allows us to do further research on the reliability and validity of Personality Dimensions®.  If you look at the Primary Colour Breakdowns over the past 14 years, you will notice very little change with them over time; In fact, there is no change from last year and the year before in the percentage breakdowns. How’s that for reliability?!?! Full statistics for the Canadian market, including this year’s, are published every year in July and are posted at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/published-statistics

Collecting workshop statistics also helps us in creating new products.  For example, the job categories found in Career Dimensions™ were taken directly from the statistics reported to us by Certified Trainers. Your statistics also helped us in developing the recently released PD for Youth Online™, and PD Basics Online.

We ask that every time you conduct an Introductory or Application Session, even if you had your clients take the assessment online,  that you keep track of your participants’ Primary Colour Preference, and Introversion/Extraversion preference.  You can find a form on the USB included with your Building Blocks/Manual to do this.  Statistics can then be faxed to 905-760-0113, or emailed to stats@clsr.ca.  You can also submit your statistics through the web at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/submit-your-statistics.

Once received at our office, our PD Stats Robot (patent still pending) diligently processes and categorizes every number and colour submitted!  Also, remember to submit your statistics even if you are administering Personality Dimensions® Online.  Remember that the assessment component isn’t the final word on an individual’s primary colour, especially if scores are close; clarification also comes from the Brightening Group exercises in a workshop.

Until next time, join us in wishing PD Stats Robot (patent still pending) safe travels and a relaxing vacation.

The First Nations Medicine Wheel Brings Understanding to African Students

As readers of this blog know, I’ve been looking for ways to build a bridge between Personality Dimensions® and First Nations people in a way that respects their culture.

Some while ago Terry Maynard (PD Level II) and during that conversation, I mentioned my interest in developing materials that would make a natural bridge between First Nations peoples and Personality Dimensions®. I was surprised to learn that Terry had already done some work with a group of aboriginal youth. I don’t know why I was surprised at this; Terry’s passion is for working with youth and he always seems to be doing creative and innovative things to engage them. In addition to the materials that he had prepared to work with the youth, he also sent me an article that I want to share with you – “The First Nations’ Medicine Wheel Brings Understanding to African Students.” Yes, that’s right; no wonder I have trouble getting him on the phone sometimes – I usually expect that he’s somewhere with a group of youth in Northern Ontario; it seems that he was recently in Africa!

~Denise Hughes

 

“As a young eagle which direction would you fly, east, north, west or south?

Image1This was a question posed by Joesph McQuabbie, Chief of Parry Sound Ojibwa. Joseph was in my Employment and Career Counselling program at George Brown College and was asked to share how First Nation Elders counsel their young people in career directions. This question was part of an hour-long story describing the four cardinal directions of the First Nation’s Medicine Wheel. It was a fantastic contribution to our class on Diversity.

Years later, as a Group Facilitator for an Outdoor Leadership Camp, I was again exposed to the Medicine Wheel. This time by my supervisor, who specialized in Shamanic Teachings, and used the Medicine Wheel as a team building and leadership development tool.

It was then that I recognized a striking similarity between the Medicine Wheel and the four personality styles of Personality Dimensions®. What amazed me was that the Medicine Wheel was developed thousands of years before the first European record of personalities by Hippocrates in 400B.C.

People new to personality styles often have a challenge remembering the different styles. However, with the styles associated to a cardinal direction and earth element, it seems easier to remember and relate. For example, I was asked to lead a Personality for Career Direction workshop with a group of Swahili-speaking female students at a secondary school on Mt. Kilimanjaro, Africa. Not only was the language translation a challenge, but introducing the concept of individual personalities was also difficult. This was a culture with a community perspective and the idea of individual personalities was foreign.

Figure 1
Terry Maynard facilitating the Medicine Wheel of Personalities

I presented personalities through a modified medicine wheel made on the ground with rope and rocks. The four directions were Kijiji’s (Villages) each living out a behaviour of one of the four personality styles. After hearing the translator share Joseph McQuabbie’s story of the Young Eagle students were asked to “fly” to the village most like them:

  • Kijiji of the East, where people think up new ideas
  • Kijiji of the North, where people are consistent and responsible
  • Kijiji of the West, where people are busy building things
  • Kijiji of the South, where people care for one another
Figure 2
Students reading attributes of their Kijiji (village)

Upon arriving at the villages the students would read a short list of attributes for the villagers and either remain at that village or fly to another. Once they settled on a village they were given a list of occupations related to that village. The occupations suited to each village were the lists of careers from the Career Dimensions component of Personality Dimensions®. With permission from CLSR, I had the list translated into Swahili and modified to make the occupations relevant to Africa.

The students loved the Medicine Wheel activity. For the first time in 10 years of working with these students it became obvious that they were starting to dream about their future. Instead of fixing their career idea on what they were exposed to (doctors, teachers, nurses), they now dreamt of new possibilities such as computer technician, truck driver, helicopter pilot, even self-employment.

Figure 3
Senior students of Makomu Secondary School, Mt. Kilimanjaro

There is no doubt in my mind that the First Nation’s Medicine Wheel is an effective method of presenting personalities to people of diverse cultures and backgrounds.

(Photos courteously provided by ABCD – Art Building Children’s Dreams, Mt. Albert, Ontario www.abcdrams.ca)

 

By: Terry Maynard

terryAbout the author: After a successful 10-year career in corporate training for one of Canada’s top banks, Terry started Unlimited Worth. Since 1995, Terry has specialized in helping young people from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds develop their leadership skills in his Outdoor Therapy programs. You can reach Terry at terry@unlimitedworth.com.

Personality Dimensions® – It’s All About Communication

We were talking about the early days of working with Personality Dimensions® at the office earlier today – okay, I was talking, the others were listening; they’re all from the next generation – and it reminded me of one presentation that really stands out in my memory and that has helped shape Personality Dimensions® in some ways.

I had been invited to speak at a gathering of leaders for a youth organization. There were leaders from all over southern Ontario present, a hundred or so if memory serves, including from their headquarters. I’d been given an hour or two to do to an introduction to temperament theory/Personality Dimensions® and I included an emphasis on interpersonal communications.

The lovely ladies (it was all ladies present) who volunteered their time and talents to the youth in their units all seemed to be really interested and a lot of discussion took place. The room was, to my eye, largely a sea of blue, and I’m not just talking about the uniforms. Sitting at the front, clustered around one large table were the leaders from headquarters – a very Organized Gold group, with some Authentic Blue and one Inquiring Green. Everyone, regardless of their plaid, was there because they wanted to do the very best job that they could for the kids.

anna-earl-1679846-unsplashI did the presentation and it was well received so I started to pack up and prepare for my 4 hour drive home. It took me another 2 hours to get out the door! Foregoing the break that was planned immediately after my presentation, many of the ladies gathered around to help me – and to talk about how my presentation applied to them specifically. While some talked about their kids or spouses and how they now recognized why they didn’t always see eye to eye – the usual reaction people have after they’ve been introduced to Personality Dimensions® – many wanted to talk about the actual organization. It seems that there had been some problems between headquarters and many of the leaders. Some were actually in tears (in case you don’t know me, I’m a bright Inquiring Green; tears can be a bit of a challenge for me to deal with so to say I was surprised at this reaction to my presentation would be quite the understatement)!

It quickly became clear that changes were being made to the program at the top level but no one was actually explaining why. Keep in mind that many of the ladies had been volunteering for several years, often starting when their own child wanted to join and a new leader was needed to keep the group going and then staying on long afterwards to continue to give to the next groups. They were hurt and felt a bit resentful. Now they understood a bit more about the differences in communication styles for each colour; it wasn’t personal, and was never intended to be.

I got home a bit later than I’d planned to that evening but the whole event left quite an impression on me – obviously; it took place almost two decades ago and I’m telling you about it now. If we are able, as Personality Dimensions® facilitators, to give those who we have the opportunity to speak with a greater sense of self-respect and understanding for others and in the process allow them to see the differences in communication styles for each colour – and fill in any missing gaps – we will have done a great thing!

 

Yours, from the back office.

Denise

Denise Hughes is the Director and owner of Denise HeadshotCLSR Inc. and general editor of Personality Dimensions® materials and products. She just noticed the calendar and realized it is just past the 44th anniversary of her introduction to career and type and temperament materials. Those experiences and the expertise she gained through her years with the Guidance Centre, University of Toronto, and now with CLSR, continue to shape the direction that both CLSR and Personality Dimensions® take.

Personality Dimensions® on TV: The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

It’s been a while, so I figured it’s time for another installment of PD on TV!  Like thousands of other people, I cut the cord on my cable a while ago, so I am not as up-to-date on what’s been on the air recently. Either way, as someone who lives and breathes Personality Dimensions®, my Personality Radar is always on – trying to get a read on people.

Fresh Prince
Photo credit: IMDB.com

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air was an instant hit when it first came out and launched the acting career of Will Smith. It had humour, drama, and some unforgettable dance moves! It was a staple for me when I was in high school back in the 90’s. Watching the reruns every day after school held me over until the new episodes came out.

After looking way back to my teenage years, and talking with a few friends, here’s my take on some of characters from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

 

 

will smith
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Will – Extraverted Resourceful Orange

 

The quick-witted rebellious Will Smith (character, not the actor) is best described as an Extroverted Resourceful Orange. Will is the life of a party, and needs to be around people to stay energised. He is quick on his feet, acts well under pressure, and can talk himself out of any situation… except for that one time. He has a natural instinct for opportunity and needs the freedom to go after it. “So you’re telling me to disobey Uncle Phil’s orders, ah-well won’t be the first time… PSSH possy out.”

 

 

Uncle Phil2
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Uncle Phil – Introverted Organized Gold

 

The dependable family man Phillip Banks (AKA Uncle Phil) is always at odds with Will. As an Introverted Organized Gold, he values his personal downtime and routine. As a lawyer, and later a judge, he respects authority and process. At the same time, family is one of the most important things to him. He worked hard to get where he is so his kids could have more opportunities and he accepted Will into the family as one of his own. Uncle Phil has helped Will out of a bind on more than one occasion, and supported him through difficult/confusing times with his own father.

 

Aunt Viv
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Aunt Vivian – Extraverted Authentic Blue

Vivian Banks’ (AKA Aunt Viv) nature can be summed up by Uncle Phil: “Oh please, Vivian. You’d believe the boy if he said he was a famous rapper and his album had just gone platinum!” As an Extraverted Authentic Blue she is a great motivator and recognises the talents of people around her. Relationships and people are important to her; it was at her insistence that Will came to stay with them after he had troubles in Philadelphia.  Aunt Viv likes maintaining harmony, so she gets to be the peacemaker between Uncle Phil, Carlton, and Will.  She was heavily involved with the human rights movement in her youth, and is the one person in the house that accepts Jazz for who he is.

 

Carleton Banks
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Carlton – Extraverted Organized Gold/Inquiring Green

Carlton, much like his cousin, is also the life of a party… but in different ways. He is completely energized by having people around, and has been known to break into dance when his self-esteem is high. He is highly rational, strategic, accountable, respectful, trusting, and loyal like most Extraverted Organized Golds/Inquiring Greens. His logical approach and strong sense of justice make Carlton often side with his father in arguments with Will.  Sometimes he lets his practicality get in the way; once saying “Dad, don’t do anything stupid! You haven’t updated your will yet.” When it comes down to it, he deeply cares for his family, and will do anything to protect him. Despite their many differences, Carlton sees and treats Will as a brother.

 

Ashley Banks
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Ashley – Extraverted Resourceful Orange

Ashley Banks starts off in the series as the quiet, reserved younger sister, not at all looking like an Extraverted Resourceful Orange; but comes into her core personality with the help of her older cousin Will.  He recognizes that she isn’t happy with the overly structured and methodically planned, quiet life that her parents chose for her, albeit with good intentions.  She is happiest and energized by being around people. From the time she skipped out on practicing classical music to listen to Will’s Walkman, to when she dropped out of private school and enrolled in a public high school, it’s clear that Ashley needs to make her own decisions to be successful in life.  She takes calculated risks like pursuing her music career, and moving across the country to study the arts.

 

geoffrey butler
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Geoffrey – Introverted Resourceful Orange/Inquiring Green

Geoffrey Butler threw me a curveball. While at work he comes across as an Introverted Inquiring Green – methodical, logical, and quality conscious. His retorts are quick, but well thought out and clever. When you look at his past, you see a very different side of him that appears Introverted Resourceful Orange. He shows his adaptability, desire for change and variety through his past professions; Oxford graduate, Olympic runner, butler to Led Zeppelin, Greco-Roman wrestler, and sparring partner to Chuck Norris. This could be a case of a strongly developed contextual self because of his chosen career, while still hanging on to his core self. Regardless of which colour preference he is drawing from, he needs his personal time to recharge. At the end of the day he returns to his room to recharge with his own interests.

So, do you remember watching The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air? Do you think my Personality Rader was tuned-in correctly? What about some of the others like Hillary, Jazz, and the second Aunt Viv? Leave your comments below and let me know what you think.

By: Brad Whitehorn

 

Brad

Brad Whitehorn – BA, CCDP is the Sales & Marketing Coordinator at CLSR Inc.  He was thrown into the career development field headfirst after completing a Communications degree in 2005, and hasn’t looked back!  Since then, Brad has worked on the development, implementation and certification for various career and personality assessments (including Personality Dimensions®), making sure that Career Development Practitioners get the right tools to best serve their clients

Relating Personality Dimensions® to First Nations Teachings

“First Nations understood personalities 3,000 years before the first European documentation in 400BC”

This statement seemed to grip the attention of a First Nations group of workshop participants. As part of the Personality Dimensions® introduction and history, I show how the First Nation’s Medicine Wheel described four types of people very similar to the styles described by Personality Dimensions®. Including this connection at the beginning of the workshop helped the participants quickly understand and remember the four colour styles. Within minutes the group was “talking in colour” as if it were second nature.

I made it clear to the group that I am not a First Nations descendant, nor have any authority regarding First Nation’s teaching. I explained that I wanted to show how First Nations were advanced in the understanding of personality over modern discoveries.

Here’s how I made the connection…

 

The Four Villages

Instead of introducing Personality Dimensions® through the Party Game exercise that uses the four Poster Cards, I used summaries of the four villages (personalities) from the First Nation’s Medicine Wheel. Here are the four Village Posters:

 

 

I asked the group to stand by the Village Poster that they relate to the most or find most interesting. After participants explained their attraction to each poster I asked them to take the poster from the wall revealing the associated Personality Dimensions® Poster Card, then I introduce each of the four personality preferences.

 

 

 

 

 

History

As a transition to the temperament history slide, I share the observation that First Nations observed four primary types of people in their Medicine Wheels 3,000 years before Hippocrates.History-of-PD

 

Circle of Self

I adapted the Circle of Self activity to create a tent card using Medicine Wheels to create pie-chart representations of the participant’s Personality Dimensions® Scores. This provided an on-going connection between their Personality Dimensions® results and the Medicine Wheel.

Circle-of-Self

 

Personality Mastery

One of the Medicine Wheel’s teachings that I value very highly is the importance of being aware of all the Cardinal Directions (personality styles) and being able to move in and out of these directions when needed for the greater good of the community. In relating this to Personality Dimensions®, I used the term “Personality Mastery.” A fellow facilitator, trained in Shamanic Ways, believes that when a person possesses Personality Mastery they become like an Elder in their community.

The group seemed to embrace personality styles very easily by visioning the four cardinal directions in the Medicine Wheel. The quest for Personality Mastery also helped to avoid “colour bashing” since it was part of their culture to respect all the personalities (villages).

 

Conclusion

If used respectfully I think the Medicine Wheel is a natural interface for Personality Dimensions® in First Nations communities. Even when I use the Medicine Wheel story with non-First Nations groups, giving it proper respect, I find it makes a tangible connection to the four Personality Dimensions® styles, something very helpful for the kinaesthetic learners in my workshops.

By: Terry Maynard

terryTerry has over 20 years of experience in delivering personality styles workshops in Corporate Training,  Human Resources, and Youth Leadership settings. Through hard work, a relentless drive to create, implement and improve effective techniques, Terry uses his unique capabilities in learning systems and understanding of people to harness the “unlimited worth” in people. Get in touch with Terry through his website at www.unlimitedworth.com.

Personality Dimensions® – More isn’t always better

PD-PictureWhile I have had the chance to meet with lots of great people at conferences, workshops, and networking events, my role at CLSR is very much behind the scenes. If you call our office, and I pick up the phone, it’s usually because the customer service team is busy with other clients; we really try our hardest to not let calls go to voicemail.  In today’s world of AI and automation, it’s kind of nice to connect with an actual human from time to time. Since I don’t often have the opportunity talk to clients and find out what’s going on in their individual worlds, I need to talk to our customer service team to know what’s up.  Really they’re great people and they’ve got interesting things to share as long as they’ve had their morning coffee.

One of the questions that keeps coming up has to do with the number of Personality Dimensions® Cards that should be used in an introductory workshop. In addition to the Picture Cards there are Life Values, In Communications, At Work, In Conflict, Relationships, and In Communications Cards. All of these cards were developed to be used in specific contexts, and for the most part shouldn’t all be used at the same time.  There are some guidelines about this in the manual, but as a general rule of thumb, more isn’t always better. From my personal experience I like to recommend the Picture, Life Values, and In Communications cards if you’re leading an introductory workshop; the one in Building Blocks.  If you’re working with one of the Toolkits, or any other kind of applications then you can add in the appropriate cards.

Personality Dimensions® Online through CLSRassessments.com has really taken off over the past few years with more and more trainers making the switch all the time. If you’ve ever tried it, you’ll know why; it frees up a bunch of time when you have face-to-face time with your clients, and it lets you know their personality preferences before you start your training. It’s very tempting to click the checkboxes beside each of the cards when you’re sending your clients the invitation to take the assessment; why not, it doesn’t cost any extra. But in reality you might be doing your clients a disservice and missing out on an opportunity for yourself in the future.

PD-RelationshipsSelecting all of the Personality Dimensions® Cards means your clients will have to spend more time focusing on the assessment, and we all know what is happening to attention spans these days. It doesn’t make the assessment any more or less valid. In fact Personality Dimensions® was validated using the Life Values in combination with two other cards.  When your clients get to see their results and see blanks on their score sheet, someone will inevitably ask why. That’s your chance as an entrepreneur to sell them on an application session, and let them know that they will get a chance to experience those, when you come back. Isn’t it great to turn a question into an opportunity?

When you come across things you’re not sure about with Personality Dimensions® reach out to us, we’re always happy to have a chat.

 

Brad

Brad Whitehorn – BA, CCDP is the Sales & Marketing Coordinator at CLSR Inc.  He was thrown in to the career development field headfirst after completing a Communications degree in 2005, and hasn’t looked back!  Since then, Brad has worked on the development, implementation and certification for various career and personality assessments (including Personality Dimensions®), making sure that Career Development Practitioners get the right tools to best serve their clients