Personality Dimensions® – Meet the Master Trainers

The Personality Dimensions® Master Trainers have been a vital part of the work that goes into ongoing development of Personality Dimensions®.  As first in our series, we would like to introduce you to Kate Jones, M.Ed.  Kate was kind enough to share a little bit about herself, and her history with Personality Dimensions®:

“The very first time I had the privilege of teaching temperament theory in a corporate setting, a participant, whose primary colour was Organized Gold, marvelled at its accuracy with, “I am a textbook Gold!” She clasped my hand at the end to thank me for helping her understand herself and like what she discovered about her special attributes. As a facilitator whose primary colour is Authentic Blue can you imagine how that made me feel? I’ m enabling people, one at a time, to like whom they discover is at the core of their being, Since that day I have not lost this feeling that Personality Dimensions® allows me to bring meaning into people’s lives, to help them discover their strengths, whether they work in schools, not-for-profit companies or corporate Canada.

Then there are the parents whom I work with often. Those who come to my seminar usually have at least one child that they may not understand as well as they would like, or whom they want to parent the best way they know how. In one of my very first parent seminars I had a mom approach me with tears in her eyes, saying “You just saved my family from a lot of heartache; I thought there was something very wrong with my daughter and now I realise that she is just completely different from her father and I….and that’s ok”! Again, for an Authentic Blue, I know that delivering Personality Dimensions® to people in a variety of settings is my calling.

As a result of some of my volunteer activities over the years with the Oakville Community Foundation, the United Way, the Canadian Cancer Society and OAAPT,  for example, I have had opportunity to deliver a Personality Dimensions® seminar. As for other volunteer positions I’ve been privileged to contribute in places such as churches, Burlington Art Gallery, Bronte Advisory Committee, and UWC, where my understanding of temperament has helped me understand and appreciate the people with whom I have worked over the years.”

Degrees: M.Ed. (Teaching & Learning); Honours B.A. (English & Psychology)

Certificates: Training & Development, Level IV Energy Diagnostic & Treatment Specialist, Solution Focused Counsellor, Positive Psychology Specialist, Retire To The Life You Design Facilitator, 2 Young 2 Retire Facilitator, Relocation and Transition Specialist, True Colors Facilitator, FIRO-B Facilitator, MBTI Trainer, and Personality Dimensions Facilitator/Master Trainer

Aside from being a great supporter and frequently running seminars, Kate’s contributions to Personality Dimensions® include

Kate has also authored the book: Her Journey: Stories of Entrepreneurs

Kate can be reached through her website: http://www.skills4people.com, or on Twitter @KateJonesAssoc.

Personality Dimensions® – I Have Bought In, aka Climbing Trees

dsc_0066During a train-the-trainer session a few years ago I had the opportunity to meet an interesting new facilitator.  At the end of the three days of training, he came up to me and said, “I see where this is going, but I just haven’t bought in yet.” He is a high Inquiring Green and I could see that he needed more time to process the information and see it play out in real time before he was going to commit to the model.

A few months later I received a phone call from him.  He started the conversations with, “I have bought in.” I immediately knew who it was … even though he didn’t say so … and couldn’t wait to hear the story that I was sure came with the conversion. This is what he told me.

‘I am working with a youth group. It is a week long program and we spend the first part of the Monday morning going over the agenda, general housekeeping issues, etc. We were scheduled to do the Personality Dimensions® workshop that afternoon. At the lunch break we were all outside; it was a nice day and there is a picnic table under a tree close by so everyone went there to eat lunch.

Three of the young men were chatting in a group and I overheard one say,“Bet you I can climb this tree!” the other two started to laugh as the tree didn’t look like one that a teenager would be able to climb very high in.  There were a few, “Cannot!,” “Can so!” comments going back and forth.

At the other end of the picnic table two other participants sat listening to this conversation. They both looked at the tree, and the young man and started to talk about the likelihood of him being able to climb, how high he might be able to go, the actual weight each branch could hold, if he should climb close to the trunk, etc.

Two other participants looked worried that he might actually attempt the climb. They voiced their concern, “What if you get hurt?” and “You might fall!”

One other young woman felt it was import to remind them all, “We are only out here to have lunch. We aren’t allowed to climb trees.”

Well, of course the young man wasn’t to be put off so up he went. Higher and higher he climbed. The two who had been part of the original conversation encouraging him all the way, “Go! Go! Lookin’ good!  Keep going!”  The two young women who were so concerned for his safety watched on with concern etched on their faces and fear in their eyes. The young men on the other end of the table continued to watch in total fascination as he passed the point at which they felt he could climb no more. The woman concerned that tree climbing was not on the agenda ran over to the Facilitator in the hopes he would do something and make it all stop.

It was at that moment that our young tree climber lost his grip and came crashing down through the branches, bounced off the picnic table, landed hard on the grass and immediately jumped to his feet with the traditional cry of, “I’m ok! I’m ok!”

His two cohorts in crime were elated and whooped with joy; racing to him and thumping him on the back. All smiling broadly. The two young ladies rushed in saying, “Are you alright? Are you ok? You should lie down, you might have a concussion or a broken bone!” The two at the end of the picnic table didn’t even move, but were now comparing notes on why they thought he was able to climb even higher than anticipated and about how the branches worked to break his fall. Our young woman who had warned all this wasn’t a good idea in the first place stormed over to get her two cents in, “I told you we weren’t supposed to be climbing trees!! Are you trying to get us all in trouble?”

The facilitator, sitting back, made note of how each responded to the situation. Three Resourceful Oranges were involved in the climbing and the encouraging of it. Two Authentic Blues worried someone might get hurt.  Two Inquiring Greens analyzed the play-by-play. One Organized Gold tried to keep everyone on plan. He wrote down his findings and waited to see if these were truly the primary colours they discovered when they did Personality Dimension that afternoon and, of course, they were.

At the end of the week he called to report, “I have bought in.”

 

Karen KloibhoferKaren Kloibhofer, Level II Personality Dimensions® Trainer is a Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Consultant with Fanshawe College with over 20 years in employability – helping match good employee candidates with the right mentor/employer.  She feels that for any career, and apprenticeship in particular, finding the right personality match between a mentor and the new employee is the key to a successful mentoring partnership.  www.karenkloibhofer.com

Personality Dimensions® Statistics

PD Stats Robot (Patent Pending)
PD Stats Robot (Patent Pending)

It’s that time of year again when the PD Stats Robot (patent pending) finally gets to take a rest after crunching a year’s worth of Personality Dimensions® workshop statistics.  The PD Stats Robot and the rest of the staff at Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc. would like to thank all of the Certified Trainers who took the time to send in their workshop statistics over the past year.  Collecting workshop statistics allows us to do further research on the reliability and validity of Personality Dimensions®.  If you look at the Primary Colour Breakdowns over the past 11 years, you will notice very little change with them over time.  Full statistics for the Canadian market, including this year’s are published every year in July and are posted at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/published-statistics

Collecting workshop statistics also helps us in creating new products.  For example, the job categories found in Career Dimensions™ were taken directly from the statistics reported to us by Certified Trainers. Your statistics also helped us in developing PD for Youth™.

We ask that every time you conduct an Introductory or Application Session that your keep track of your participants’ Primary Colour Preference, and Introversion/Extraversion preference.  You can find a form on the disk included with your Building Blocks/Manual to do this.  Statistics can then be faxed in to 905-760-0113, or emailed to stats@clsr.ca.  You can also submit your statistics through the web at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/submit-your-statistics.

Once received at our office, our PD Stats Robot (patent pending) diligently processes and categorizes every number and colour submitted!  Also remember to submit your statistics even if you are administering Personality Dimensions® Online.  Remember that the assessment component isn’t the final word on an individual’s primary colour, especially if scores are close; clarification also comes from the Brightening Group exercises in a workshop.

Personality Dimensions® – Greetings from Hong Kong

It seems like yesterday when I delivered my very first Personality Dimensions® workshop in Hong Kong in July 2005 at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Continuing Education Program!  From then onward, we started training qualified Personality Dimensions®  Trainers in Hong Kong, and translating the materials into Chinese.  To date, we are an active network of 1,171 Level 1 Trainers and 53 Level 2 Facilitators in Hong Kong, Mainland China, and Macau!  We have developed the Chinese Participant pack (which is translated from the English Basic version), Chinese Dimension Cards, Chinese Picture Card and Poster Card, Chinese Career Dimensions, and Personality Dimensions® Manual and Building Blocks.

2016-06-09 20.40.23We held our very first Talking in Colour on January 23, 2016 which was well attended by trainers, and we decided we should continue this tradition so that the trainers have a platform to share their experiences and learn about new Personality Dimensions®  materials.

Stay tuned for the pre-order of Chinese PD for Youth.   We have just completed the translation of the PD for Youth Dimension and Picture Cards, PD for Youth Participant Pack, and PD for Youth Power Point Presentation CD.   We will be posting the link for pre-ordering in the next week or two!   The items will be offers at 30% discount during the pre-order period.  We have also begun the translation of the 2nd edition of the Personality Dimensions® Manual and Building Blocks.  Last but not least, we are working on the development of the Chinese PD-Online system.  We encountered major programming problems, which delayed our launch in the beginning of 2016.  We have to painfully decide to scrap the whole system and start from scratch again.  The good news is we have found a great programmer, who is working on the system as we speak.  The expected delivery date of the Chinese PD- Online system is October 2016.  We will keep you posted of any new developments.

Please feel free to drop me a line or two…or drop by when you venture out to Hong Kong!

Have a great summer!

 

Angela ShikAngela Shik, PhD MSW is a PD Master Trainer the Director of Dr Motivate  – Distributor of Personality Dimensions materials in Hong Kong, Mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan.  She can be reached at angela@drmotivate.com.  Her office is at Level 15 Langham Place, 8 Argyle Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Personality Dimensions® – Raising Awareness of Learning Styles

Personality Dimensions®  of Year 5/6 Students and Teachers – Raising Awareness of Learning Styles and the Implications for Educators

 

Introduction

“When someone is teaching us in our most comfortable style, we learn.” (McCarthy, 1980)

Personality Dimensions® uses the metaphor of colour to describe the four types of learners and how they need to be responded to (Tudor & Konyu, 2011). Based on the Learning Style descriptors of Bernice McCarthy, these types are:

  • Authentic Blue or Type 1 – Innovative Learners
  • Inquiring Green or Type 2 – Analytic Learners
  • Organised Gold or Type 3 – Common Sense Learners
  • Resourceful Orange or Type 4 – Dynamic Learners

In addition, Personality Dimensions® incorporates an understanding of Introversion and Extraversion preferences and the impact of these preferences, not only on the individual – by recognising how they are energised – but also on how others see and relate to them. According to Tudor and Konyu, “the Introversion/Extraversion function will impact…the participatory needs of the learner.”
Personality Dimensions®

Personality Dimensions® (PD) is a human relations model, presented in an interactive workshop format. Its strength lies in its self-discovery process and balanced learning style delivery. The Colour picture card depictions of the four temperaments are designed to help participants retain the information. They often begin to immediately apply this information to their lives.

 

Personality Dimensions® and Temperament Theory

Personality Dimensions® relies heavily on earlier theorists as well as independent studies. Theorists responsible for developing the concept of four temperaments are the ‘pre-psychological theorists: Hippocrates; Galen; Avencena; Kant, and the late 19th to mid-century theorists: Adickes; James; Spranger; Kretschmer; Jung and Fromm (Campbell, 2014).

Temperament Theory states that individuals are born with a predisposition to act and interact in certain ways to meet underlying needs. The term “Temperament Styles” was introduced by Keirsey in his seminal book Please Understand Me II (Keirsey, 1998). His publication contains in-depth descriptions of the four Temperaments: Intuitive Feeler (NF), Intuitive Thinker (NT), Sensing Judger (SJ) and Sensing Perceiver (SP).

Personality Dimensions® has added descriptors (as above) that reflect important aspects of each Temperament Style – Authentic Blue (NF), Inquiring Green (NT), Organized Gold (SJ) and Resourceful Orange (SP).

Personality Dimensions® states that we are all a “blend” of the four Temperaments and, although we have a preferred Temperament Style – Core self – other Colours are available to us in varying degrees – Developed self and Contextual self (Berens, 2010).

 

Background

Since 2004, the author has delivered Personality Dimensions® to the corporate sector, Not-for-profit organisations and universities for multiple applications including: developing leadership cultures which engage employees, team building, developing people skills, improving communication, building relationships; raising awareness of learning and teaching styles; and career development. In 2009, a simplified format of the self-assessment, PD for Youth, was developed by the publishers, at the behest of the author. For the first time, anywhere, PD for Youth was introduced into the level 4 school curriculum (grade 5/6) of Melbourne Metropolitan schools.

At any level of education, Personality Dimensions® can assist students to recognise their learning styles, and to discover their natural skills and talents. It validates students for who they are and can, thereby, build self-worth – the vital component of confidence. Personality Dimensions® can also foster an understanding of others – building empathy and respect. Thus, it lays the foundation for developing two pillars of emotional intelligence: self-awareness and awareness of others.

 

The Study

Over a period of six years, 398 students (in years 5 and 6) and 48 teachers, at seven schools located in the Yarra Ranges, Manningham and Whitehorse Councils, undertook the Personality Dimensions® assessment.

A total of ten workshop programs were facilitated, each with a minimum of 12 students and their respective teachers. Results for a teacher professional development day are included in this study. (Principals results were excluded unless they had direct teaching responsibilities).

School Year of workshop
Warrandyte Primary S 2010 & 2011
Yering, Chum Creek & Gruyere PS 2012
Wonga Park PS 2012, 2013, 2014, 2014, 2015
Anderson Creek PS 2012
Orchard Grove PS 2014

 

Results

First preference colours were collated and the percentages of teachers versus students were compared. The table and chart below show the comparisons.

Authentic Blue (Keirsey – NF) Type 1 – Innovative Learners Inquiring Green (Keirsey – NT) Type 2 – Analytic Learners Organised Gold (Keirsey – SJ) Type 3 – Common Sense Learners Resourceful Orange (Keirsey – SP) Type 4 – Dynamic Learners
Teachers

n=48

52.1%

6.3% 31.2% 10.4%

Students

n=398

29.4% 11.8% 12.6%

46.2%

 

Discussion

This data show an under-representation of both Resourceful Orange and Inquiring Green teachers in these Primary Schools. Authentic Blue and Organised Gold teachers comprise over 80 per cent of teachers. Authentic Blues and Organised Golds have a higher ratio of teachers to students with the same temperament. This is advantageous to their similarly traited students, because the way they teach is the way their temperaments learn.

Each temperament presents special challenges to their non-similarly traited teachers. However, as Resourceful Orange students constituted 46.2 per cent of students, and the ratio of Resourceful Orange teachers to students is grossly disproportionate, the discussion will focus on the ramifications on learning for this cohort, as an example. It is not to be construed that these students are the most difficult to teach or that they require the most adaptation by a non-Resourceful Orange teacher.

Resourceful Orange students are dynamic learners and as such need an active, changing environment. They learn through movement (Robinson & Aronica, 2009) and this is likely to be considered as hyperactivity, by teachers with temperaments whose learning needs are different. They are action and hands-on learners and prefer to be manipulating, operating or making something (Tudor & Konyu, 2011). Sitting at a desk is anathema to them.

A failure to understand the needs of Resourceful Orange students may result in a relatively high number of these students unable to thrive in the conventional school system. Indeed, the author has observed a preponderance of this temperament in disengaged adolescent and young adult clients, whose parents turned to her to provide career counselling for their children. (A study of “at-risk” students would be needed to confirm this observation).

So, how well are teachers of different temperaments able to provide a learning environment which engages Resourceful Orange students?
The Authentic Blue preference endows people with innate temperament traits which enable them to “read others very well and adjust their communication style to meet the situation…. They are intuitive and sensitive to the needs of others… They are empathic and very good at inspiring and motivating others to reach their full potential” (McKim, Detailed Descriptions of the Four Temperaments, 2013). Authentic Blue teachers can mirror others’ behaviour to build rapport, so they are adaptable and able to provide an empathic learning environment for all the other Temperaments.

These Authentic Blue traits were corroborated in a separate adult study conducted by the author (a NeuroPQ® assessor) with Dario Nardi and presented as a concurrent session at the Brisbane AusAPT conference (Riddle & Nardi, 2014). The study, which focused on Personality Dimensions and Emotional Intelligence (EQi), found that Authentic Blues scored high in the EQi cognitive skills areas of the neo-cortex (F7, T4 and T5 and O2) related to “Awareness of Others” and “Managing Others” including: social rapport (they are able to mirror others’ behaviour); intuitive listening; sensitivity to facial expressions and social feedback ( they notice how other people respond to them and adjust their behaviour to aid, conform or appease) and attention to body language (Nardi, 2014).

On the down-side, Authentic Blues are “very concerned about the impact of process” (McKim, Tying it all Together, 2013) and so they tend to give what may be perceived as lengthy explanations. Resourceful Orange students have no time for wordy details and prefer to jump in and get going.

The Organized Golds are caring and concerned with the well-being of others. They show this by being highly organised and efficient. They see rules, procedures and routine as necessary to make things easier for people to understand (McKim, Detailed Descriptions of the Four Temperaments, 2013). However, these very attributes are all key learning stressors for the Resourceful Orange Temperament (Tudor & Konyu, 2011). Organized Golds do things in a particular way and this involves prioritising, planning and having timeframes. Whereas, Resourceful Oranges are multi-taskers – often doing several things at once – and they like to do things in their own way and in their own time. Resourceful Orange students may feel constrained and view the Organized Golds’ approach as “authoritarian” and perceive their feedback as criticism – further learning stressors.

The results of the NeuroPQ study showed that Organized Golds’ scores were weak in the F7 and O2 regions of social rapport and attention to body language, so they may tend to be less intuitively aware of others [than Authentic Blues] so may not see the need to adapt their style to provide learning environments which suit the Resourceful Orange student.

Inquiring Greens are innately curious and focussed on the pursuit of knowledge. They need to “know” and are comfortable when they can explain how and why they “know” (McKim, Detailed Descriptions of the Four Temperaments, 2013). Semantics tend to make Resourceful Orange students phase-out – they prefer action to discussion and analysis (McKim, Tying it all Together, 2013). In addition, Inquiring Greens present information as abstract concepts – a further learning stressor for the Resourceful Orange student (Tudor & Konyu, 2011).

The results of the NeuroPQ study showed that Inquiring Greens were weak in the F7 and O2 regions of social rapport and attention to body language, so they, like Organized Golds, may not instinctively provide learning environments which suit the Resourceful Orange student.

 

Outcomes of Introduction of Personality Dimensions® into Primary School Curriculum.

In this study, teachers observed the environments which different temperaments valued and which allowed them to work at their best. Teachers reported that seeing their students from a new perspective helped them to better understand their needs, skills and challenges. This enabled them to construct strategies to connect students to their style of learning. They were now able to better plan and develop their lessons so they could appeal to, and engage, each of the temperaments.

Furthermore, teachers commented that “it was great for students to understand their Colours and [validate] how they learn. The students were “now able to use this language of Colour to their advantage” and apply it to achieving their full potential. “This has given them transferable skills and knowledge for the future.”

One Principal reported that “Personality Dimensions® will definitely stick in my head better than others I have done”. A teacher relayed that “None of the other programs I have done were as useful in the classroom as this one.”

 

Conclusions and Implications

There is a high ratio of Authentic Blue and Organized Gold teachers to their same temperament students, which is advantageous for these students.

The innate traits of Authentic Blue endow them with the ability to adapt to the learning needs of disparate Temperaments. Organized Golds and Inquiring Greens do not have these innate traits.

It is noted that Inquiring Green teachers are largely under-represented in the Primary schools in this study. The effect on Inquiring Green students has not been discussed in this article.

There is a pronounced disparity in the ratio of Resourceful Orange teachers to students of the same Temperament. The implications on learning, for this Temperament, have been discussed, as an example.

Primary school provides the foundation for learning. It is essential that educators have an understanding of the learning needs of the diverse temperaments in order to provide learning environments and strategies that maximise education. An understanding of Introversion and Extraversion preferences is also necessary to meet the participatory needs of the learner. Personality Dimensions® provides a user-friendly approach to help achieve these educational goals.

Awareness is the key. Not all temperaments are able to innately “read” the learning styles of their non-similarly traited students. The author recommends the introduction of Personality Dimensions® into teacher education and professional development. This will enable teachers to expand their toolkit of strategies to maximise the learning experience of all temperaments. Combined PD workshops for teachers and their students can assist teachers to recognise the behaviours of the disparate temperaments and to adjust their communication and teaching styles, accordingly.

 

References

Berens, L. (2010). Understanding Yourself and Others: An Introduction to the 4 Temperaments. Huntington Beach, CA: Telos Publications.

Campbell, S. (2014). History of Personality Dimensions. Retrieved from Personality Dimensions CLSR Canada: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/#!history/ckqh

Keirsey, D. (1998). Please Understand Me II. Del Mar, CA: Prometheus Nemesis Book Company.

McCarthy, B. (1980). The 4Mat System: Teaching to Learning Styles with Right/Left Mode Techniques. Barrington, Illinois: Excel Inc. Retrieved from ISBN0-9608992-0-0

McKim, L. (2013). Detailed Descriptions of the Four Temperaments. Personality Dimensions [Facilitator] Manual Ed 2. Concord, Ontario, Canada: Career/Lifeskills Resources Inc.

McKim, L. (2013). Tying it all Together. Personality Dimensions – A Guide for Facilitators Ed 2. Concord, Ontario, Canada: Career/Lifeskills Resources Inc.

Nardi, D. (2014). Cognitive Skills Profile. Neuroscience of Personality: Certification Workshop. Los Angeles, California, USA: Radiance House.

Riddle, C., & Nardi, D. (2014). Leadership Qualities (EQi) for Career Development. AusAPT 11th Bienniel Conference. Brisbane.

Robinson, K., & Aronica, L. (2009). The Element. New York: Viking.

Tudor, M., & Konyu, L. (2011). Personality Dimensions: A Guide for Facilitators and Teachers. Concord, Ontario, Canada: Career/Lifeskills Resurces Inc.

 

Acknowledgements

The author wishes to acknowledge the invaluable contribution of Catherine Gerhardt, Level I Personality Dimensions® facilitator. Cathy was trained and accredited by the author. Her excellent organisation and presentation of the workshops has been a pivotal aspect of this study. Cathy’s diligent collection and reporting of temperament preference statistics has enabled the author to produce this study. http://www.classroomconnections.com.au
The author is grateful for the comprehensive proof-reading and suggestions by Denise Hughes and Julia Bartrim, which have enriched this article.

 

Author

Cecile Riddle MHealthSc (HRM) LaTrobe; Fellow, Career Development Association of Australia; Member, Australian Association of Personality Type

 

About the Author

cecileCecile Riddle is a Coach, Mentor and Learning Facilitator who specialises in developing emotionally intelligent leaders. She is an International Master Trainer of Personality Dimensions® and trains assessors to be internationally certified as Personality Dimensions® Level I facilitators.
For more information: http://www.primeperformance.com.au

 

This article was first published in the Australian Association of Personality Type Magazine, Summer Ed. 2016

Personality Dimensions® – Did You Know?

Participant-PackFrom the initial launch in 2003, Personality Dimensions® has aimed to meet the needs of the individual trainer by carefully listening to and understanding their feedback.  We recognised early on that a “one size fits all” approach would not be in the best interest of trainers or their clients.  This is why there are different versions of the same Personality Dimensions® resources.  Currently, there are 7 different Participant Pack and Dimensions Cards versions (soon to be 8!) in different languages, reading levels and contexts.  These are: Adult English, English Basics, English PD for Youth, Adult French, French Basics, Adult Spanish, Adult Chinese, and coming soon, Chinese PD for Youth.

The Adult English materials are where we started.  These are written at a grade 8 reading level, using the Flesch–Kincaid readability formula.  The Adult English Participant Packs are designed to be used in conjunction with the Adult English Dimensions Cards and Picture Cards.  These materials are best suited to a general adult population.

PD Basics English Participant Packs and PD Basics Dimensions Cards are contextually the same as the Adult English Participant Packs, however they are written at a grade 5 reading level.  These materials are not intended to be used in conjunction with the Adult materials; however the same Picture Card is used with either version.  They are designed to be used with an adult population where literacy is a challenge, or where English is not the primary language.

One of the latest additions to the Personality Dimensions® lineup is the PD for Youth Participant Pack.  Like the PD Basics resources, it is also written at a grade 5 reading level, however the content is contextually different from the Adult resources.  Paired with the PD@School Dimensions Card, and the standard English Picture Card, this version better speaks to teenagers in high school.  A separate PowerPoint is also available that matches the context of the materials.

The Adult French Participant Packs are much the same as their English counterpart, and are also written at a grade 8 reading level.  These are intended to be used with the Adult French Dimensions Cards, and French Picture Cards.  The Adult French resources are best used with a general adult, French-speaking population.

Similarly the PD Basics or DP l’essentiel Participant Pack and DP l’essentiel Dimensions Cards are contextually the same as the Adult French Participant Packs, however they are written at a grade 5 reading level.  These materials are not intended to be used in conjunction with the Adult materials; however the same Picture Card is used with either version.  These are designed to be used with an adult population where literacy is a challenge, or where French is not the primary language.

The Spanish Participant Pack, Dimensions Cards, and Picture Cards were developed over a period of time with translators in Mexico, overseen by a Personality Dimensions Level II Trainer.  These materials are designed to be used together, and are written at a grade 6 reading level.  They are best suited to a Spanish-speaking adult population.

The Chinese-language (Traditional) Participant Packs, Dimensions Cards, and Picture Cards was a large undertaking that involved translators in Canada and Hong Kong, as well as testing, and verification taking place in both countries.  This was overseen by PD Master Trainer, Dr. Angela Shik.  Necessary contextual changes were made to best reflect the language and culture in Hong Kong.

Soon to be released, initially in Hong Kong, and eventually Canada, is the PD for Youth Participant Pack and Dimensions Cards in Traditional Chinese.  These resources will be similar to their English counterparts, where the content is contextually appropriate for teenagers in high school.

Figuring out which materials to order can be a challenge, especially with so many options available; but rest assured our customer service team is here to help.  We check every order that comes in individually to make sure everything makes sense; if something seems a little strange to us, we will always give you call to verify things.   We also want your feedback.  Do you see a need for different materials that would better suit your clients?  Do you have a great idea for a Tool-Kit?  Get in touch with us, we’re always happy to hear from you.

Personality Dimensions® – Musings from the Back Office

2015As I write this a local radio station is playing seasonal music in the background, yet another reminder that this year is almost at a close. In some ways it seems like we were just welcoming this year into existence and in others I can’t believe it’s only been one year!  Looking back I’m amazed at what took place. In addition to packing up and moving – lock, stock and barrel (or, in our case, boxes and boxes and boxes) – to our new location in Aurora, Ontario, we managed to bring out revisions to both the Personality Dimensions® Manual and the Building Blocks Facilitator Guide. Our sincere thanks to Lynda McKim, Scott Campbell, Carole Cameron and everyone else who made this possible. And, thanks to the input from Personality Dimensions® Trainers, we also created the new PD for Youth materials.

So, what does 2016 hold? Dr. Angela Shik and her team are hard at work creating the Chinese version of the on-line Personality Dimensions® assessments which will launch in January. In addition to all her hard work in Hong Kong and China, Angela is also opening a California-based office and has already done work using both the English and Spanish materials in that area. Our hats are off to Angela!

Emil Boychuk, along with a great team of facilitators and educators, is putting the final touches  on a new resource for use in the classroom – a Personality Dimensions® Awareness Workshop for Students (suggestions for a more creative title are welcome!). We are planning to introduce this to you late winter/early spring of 2016. We have tentative plans for several other Personality Dimensions® happenings, including some face-to-face and/or web-based learning and networking opportunities… so stay tuned.

You may have noticed that you didn’t get a Christmas greeting card from us this year. Instead, we are making a donation to the local Salvation Army in support of community outreach programs. Cards have always been part of the traditions I was raised in so this has been a bit of a rethink for me. But the reality of how great the needs of the community are was made clear to me after I spent time working to register people who need the help of the Sally Ann to get through this Christmas.

My wish for you is that the joy and beauty of the season make this an especially warm and happy holiday for you and yours. We look forward to joining you in making our world a better place in 2016.

Yours, from the back office … Denise

 

Denise Hughes is the Director and owner of Denise HeadshotCareer/LifeSkills Resources Inc. and general editor of Personality Dimensions® materials and products. She just noticed the calendar and realized it is just past the 41st anniversary of her introduction to career and type and temperament materials. Those experiences and the expertise she gained through her years with the Guidance Centre, University of Toronto, and now with CLSR, continue to shape the direction that both Career/LifeSkills Resources and Personality Dimensions® take.

Personality Dimensions® – Musings from the Back Office

Why Was Personality Dimensions® Developed?

listening dog

Every once in a while someone will ask me why we developed Personality Dimensions®. To answer I tell the story of a meeting of career counsellors and resource people that took place in the late ‘80’s. I had taken along a pile of new things that I thought the group would be interested in knowing about and was seated at my usual place at the back of the room. This was a great group of people; we knew each other well and took great delight in sharing information and networking, all with the goal of providing the best for the students we helped. Since this meeting was in the Toronto area it was well attended with about 50 or 60 people present. From the front of the room the head of career services for the largest public school board in Canada called to me and asked if I knew of something that they could use with students who were on track to be early school leavers. These kids had had enough, wanted out and wouldn’t be sticking around; and the career counsellors and educators were looking for something that would help them as they moved into this new phase of their lives. She asked for something that would help the students learn about themselves, perhaps understand why they didn’t do well in the school environment and maybe help them in their job hunt. Oh, and by the way, it couldn’t look like anything else they had done at school! A tall order, for sure!

That was the very beginning of how I became involved in working with temperament theory models. Personality Dimensions® evolved as we realized that far more research needed to be done, both on the tool itself and on the theory that it supported, to make the theory more usable and acceptable in the Canadian cultural context. We asked for input from facilitators, counsellors, educators and individuals from all walks of life on what would make it as useful and valuable as possible and how the final tool should look. And these folks were very generous in their support. They participated in the baseline survey we devised to determine statistical validity; some attended Focus Groups across the country and we paid attention to every concrete suggestion made for any and all aspects of the system.

So, in short, Personality Dimensions® was developed because we listened. You asked for it, you shaped it and you continue to evolve it through your suggestions, comments and feedback. And I promise you that we’ll keep listening and trying to help just like we did way back in the late ‘80’s (or, as my kids used to say, “back when dinosaurs roamed the earth and Mom was young”).

Yours, from the back office … Denise

 

Denise Hughes is the Director and owner of Denise HeadshotCareer/LifeSkills Resources Inc. and general editor of Personality Dimensions® materials and products. She just noticed the calendar and realized it is just past the 41st anniversary of her introduction to career and type and temperament materials. Those experiences and the expertise she gained through her years with the Guidance Centre, University of Toronto, and now with CLSR, continue to shape the direction that both Career/LifeSkills Resources and Personality Dimensions® take.

Personality Dimensions Statistics

Did you know that we have been collecting Personality Dimensions® workshop statistics for over 10 years?  We ask that every time you conduct an Introductory or Application Session that your keep track of your participants’ Primary Colours, and Introversion/Extraversion preference.  You can find a convenient form on the disk included with your Building Blocks/Manual to do this.  Statistics can then be faxed in to 905-760-0113, or emailed to stats@clsr.ca.  You can also submit your statistics through the web at http://www.personalitydimensions.com/#!submit-your-statistics/cyo7.  Once received at our office, our PD Stats Robot (patent pending) diligently processes and categorizes every number and colour submitted!  Also remember to submit your statistics even if you are administering Personality Dimensions® Online.  Remember that the assessment component isn’t the final word on an individual’s primary colour, especially if scores are close; clarification also comes from the Brightening Group exercises in a workshop.

PD Stats Robot (Patent Pending)
PD Stats Robot (Patent Pending)

Why do we collect statistics? Collecting workshop statistics allows us to do further research on the reliability and validity of Personality Dimensions®.  If you look at the Primary Colour Breakdowns over the past 10 years, you will notice  very little change with them over time.  Full statistics for the Canadian market are published every year in July and are posted at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/#!published-statistics/c1rkp

Collecting workshop statistics also helps us in creating new products.  For example, the job categories found in Career Dimensions™ were taken directly from the statistics reported to us by Certified Trainers. Your statistics also helped us in developing the recently released PD for Youth™.

Next time you run a Personality Dimensions® workshop don’t forget to send us your workshop statistics.

“It is the mark of a truly intelligent person to be moved by statistics.” 

~George Bernard Shaw

Personality Dimensions for Youth

PD for Youth

Now available from Personality Dimensions®: PD for Youth™.  Based on the popular PD@School™ site licence, PD for Youth™ is designed to be used with students in grade 7 – 12, and can be purchased by any qualified Personality Dimensions® trainer.  The components are the same as the standard version; however the content has been tailored to suit the needs of students.

To administer PD for Youth™ with your students/clients you will need 1 set of Picture Cards for each (reusable), 1 set of PD@School™ Cards for each (reusable), and 1 Participant Pack™ (consumable) for each.  The available PowerPoint presentation follows the narrative of the Building Blocks™, however the content and language has been modified for students.  Read more about the individual products at: http://career-lifeskills.com/personality-dimensions-6/pd-for-youth-169/.

For trainers in Australia and Hong Kong, please contact your local distributor for pricing and availability.