Personality Dimensions® Master Trainers

Did you know that Personality Dimensions® has an elite group of master trainers?

The list of Personality Dimensions® Master Trainers is very small. This group is comprised of people who have made substantial contributions to the growth of Personality Dimensions® through research and development. Several of the longest-standing members have retired and periodically we award Master Trainer status to Level II facilitators who have made this type of contribution.

In the coming weeks, we will post more about the newest members to the group – something I am remiss in not doing a while ago; as well as more about the long standing members. We want to show you how Personality Dimensions® is truly a plaid in and of itself – created my an amazing team. You may want to connect with one or more if you have shared interests or with questions that they might be able to assist you with, or just to say hello and renew acquaintances.

Personality Dimensions® continues to evolve, in large part, because of the work and research that these people have put into it – and often in response to requests that other facilitators have made for more information. You asked for it, you shaped it and you continue to evolve it through your suggestions, comments and feedback.

 

Yours, from the back office … Denise

 

Denise Hughes is the Director and owner of Denise HeadshotCareer/LifeSkills Resources Inc. and general editor of Personality Dimensions® materials and products. She just noticed the calendar and realized it is just past the 41st anniversary of her introduction to career and type and temperament materials. Those experiences and the expertise she gained through her years with the Guidance Centre, University of Toronto, and now with CLSR, continue to shape the direction that both Career/LifeSkills Resources and Personality Dimensions® take.

Personality Dimensions® – I Have Bought In, aka Climbing Trees

dsc_0066During a train-the-trainer session a few years ago I had the opportunity to meet an interesting new facilitator.  At the end of the three days of training, he came up to me and said, “I see where this is going, but I just haven’t bought in yet.” He is a high Inquiring Green and I could see that he needed more time to process the information and see it play out in real time before he was going to commit to the model.

A few months later I received a phone call from him.  He started the conversations with, “I have bought in.” I immediately knew who it was … even though he didn’t say so … and couldn’t wait to hear the story that I was sure came with the conversion. This is what he told me.

‘I am working with a youth group. It is a week long program and we spend the first part of the Monday morning going over the agenda, general housekeeping issues, etc. We were scheduled to do the Personality Dimensions® workshop that afternoon. At the lunch break we were all outside; it was a nice day and there is a picnic table under a tree close by so everyone went there to eat lunch.

Three of the young men were chatting in a group and I overheard one say,“Bet you I can climb this tree!” the other two started to laugh as the tree didn’t look like one that a teenager would be able to climb very high in.  There were a few, “Cannot!,” “Can so!” comments going back and forth.

At the other end of the picnic table two other participants sat listening to this conversation. They both looked at the tree, and the young man and started to talk about the likelihood of him being able to climb, how high he might be able to go, the actual weight each branch could hold, if he should climb close to the trunk, etc.

Two other participants looked worried that he might actually attempt the climb. They voiced their concern, “What if you get hurt?” and “You might fall!”

One other young woman felt it was import to remind them all, “We are only out here to have lunch. We aren’t allowed to climb trees.”

Well, of course the young man wasn’t to be put off so up he went. Higher and higher he climbed. The two who had been part of the original conversation encouraging him all the way, “Go! Go! Lookin’ good!  Keep going!”  The two young women who were so concerned for his safety watched on with concern etched on their faces and fear in their eyes. The young men on the other end of the table continued to watch in total fascination as he passed the point at which they felt he could climb no more. The woman concerned that tree climbing was not on the agenda ran over to the Facilitator in the hopes he would do something and make it all stop.

It was at that moment that our young tree climber lost his grip and came crashing down through the branches, bounced off the picnic table, landed hard on the grass and immediately jumped to his feet with the traditional cry of, “I’m ok! I’m ok!”

His two cohorts in crime were elated and whooped with joy; racing to him and thumping him on the back. All smiling broadly. The two young ladies rushed in saying, “Are you alright? Are you ok? You should lie down, you might have a concussion or a broken bone!” The two at the end of the picnic table didn’t even move, but were now comparing notes on why they thought he was able to climb even higher than anticipated and about how the branches worked to break his fall. Our young woman who had warned all this wasn’t a good idea in the first place stormed over to get her two cents in, “I told you we weren’t supposed to be climbing trees!! Are you trying to get us all in trouble?”

The facilitator, sitting back, made note of how each responded to the situation. Three Resourceful Oranges were involved in the climbing and the encouraging of it. Two Authentic Blues worried someone might get hurt.  Two Inquiring Greens analyzed the play-by-play. One Organized Gold tried to keep everyone on plan. He wrote down his findings and waited to see if these were truly the primary colours they discovered when they did Personality Dimension that afternoon and, of course, they were.

At the end of the week he called to report, “I have bought in.”

 

Karen KloibhoferKaren Kloibhofer, Level II Personality Dimensions® Trainer is a Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Consultant with Fanshawe College with over 20 years in employability – helping match good employee candidates with the right mentor/employer.  She feels that for any career, and apprenticeship in particular, finding the right personality match between a mentor and the new employee is the key to a successful mentoring partnership.  www.karenkloibhofer.com

Personality Dimensions® – New Web-Based Assessment Application

Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc. Celebrates Launch of New Web-Based Assessment Application.

Leading Personality Assessment Publisher Creates New User Experience Application for Personality Dimensions Online.

main-page-monitorAurora, ON: Today, Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc., a leading publisher of career development and organizational development materials, specializing in personality assessments, announced the launch of their new web-based assessment application, CLSRassessments.co.  Since launching Personality Dimensions® Online 7 years ago, Career/LifeSkills has seen exponential growth with Certified Trainers around the world.  Existing clients who would like to switch to the new application today can contact info@clsr.ca or 1-877-680-0200 with their request.

Upon seeing the newly developed CLSRassessments web application, Career/LifeSkills Resources Director, Denise Hughes remarked, “After many months of hard work and refinement I am absolutely delighted to see the new, fully revised and mobile friendly, CLSRassessments web application. It has been a labour of love that came about as a direct result of the feedback that we’ve received from our clients around the world. The new look and feel, along with the new features are sure to benefit everyone.”

Redevelopment of the application has taken several months, mindfully incorporating the feedback and suggestions from Certified Trainers who have utilized the previous application as part of their toolkit.  New features include:

  • Full mobile accessibility. Facilitators and clients can access the application using a smart phone, tablet, iPad, netbook, laptop, or desktop anywhere in the world with internet access.
  • New assessment reports: Updated and refreshed, each assessment has a newly designed/researched report.

 

About the company: Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc. is a publisher and distributor of career development and organizational development materials, specializing in assessments, curriculums, videos, and books.  Founded in 1998 Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc. has prided itself in listening to its clients, and offering the best resources based to meet their needs.  Career/LifeSkills Resouces Inc. launched its premier resource, Personality Dimensions® in 2003 which has been experienced by over 1 million individuals to date.

Personality Dimensions – What You See, What You Hear

Big-Group-of-PeopleMichael Tudor (Personality Dimensions® Master Trainer) had his class of Teacher Candidates at the University of Toronto complete the face to face Personality Dimensions® assessment. Michael then asked them to select someone they knew to do the assessment. Could they gain some insight about their subject’s top colour preference by either the way they responded to the request or while they were completing the assessment? To this end the teacher candidates were encouraged to pay attention to verbal and/or non-verbal cues.

They were asked to document their subject’s reactions under the title “What you see, what you hear.”

Here are some of the more telling, revealing and amusing responses…

Authentic Blue:

1) Eager and willing participant. Very attentive. Closed by saying: “I hope you get a good grade.”

2) He said “I would be more than happy to help you”. Very inviting and welcoming. Concerned with final score. At the end said “Oh is that all? Do you want me to help you by answering any other questions?

3) She asked if the questions were hard. Was worried about doing well.

4) Very interested in helping me with the assignment. Attentive and conscientious throughout the process. Was happy to connect with the Authentic Blue picture card.

Inquiring Green:

1) Asked a billion questions. Was impressed that I actually had background knowledge. Analysed every word and looked them up in the dictionary. Took the entire process very seriously.

2) Although at the outset my subject had no preliminary questions pertaining to the exercise, he did begin to analyse the validity of the assessment and my subjectivity in administering it. He questioned the ability of this assessment to accurately define who he is.

3) Questions as follows: “How long will this take? Do I really need to do this? Should I leave the TV on or off? Why Me? I don’t need a long explanation. Just get to the point”

4) Seriously examined the pictures on the cards for a very long time. Then uttered “This is so stupid. Someone associated a picture with a colour? I mean the organized gold card should be the colour green because green represents money (pointing at the dollar sign on the organized gold card). The green card should be brown or grey….. Why do psychologists major in this area if they can’t even get the colours right? Who are they to set such standards? “

5) “Do you think I know myself well enough to answer those questions truthfully and get accurate results?” When he was assured that this was a logically designed assessment, this seemed to assuage his anxiety about the prospect of having to reflect on his feelings

Organized Gold:

1) Took the assessment very seriously. Took time to rearrange the cards until he was satisfied with the results. Very concerned about performing the requirements to the best of his ability.

2) For the assessment to be completed, I had to schedule it ahead of time. In addition, the day before the assessment I was told that it had to be completed by a certain time because something else had been planned afterwards. Wanted no interruptions. Read all instructions twice. The common reaction to all the Resourceful Orange traits was “Absolutely not me.”

3) Followed my instructions to the letter. No indecision on which cards or words were preferred. Wanted all the numbers on the Traits and Characteristics pressure sensitive sheet to be written inside the boxes. Misplaced one number and requested a new assessment.

4) Very willing to assist. Asked the following ‘When are we going to do this? How long will it take? Scheduled time during second intermission of hockey game. Became annoyed when it took longer than expected and missed part of third period. Started whining “Can I watch TV now?

Resourceful Orange:

1) When approached about the assessment he said very little. During the assessment he just did what I asked him to do while stating that he hates following instructions. However very focused and calm despite the fact that we were in a noisy downtown bar where he was able to take a haul off his cigarette and a sip of his pint.

2) Interested at first. At times only physically present. Kept changing radio stations. Questions such as “How much longer? Must you explain it all? Later began to appreciate the results.

3) While completing the card sort, the subject lay on his back, hands behind head; then shifted to lie on one side with head propped up by one arm. Although excited to find out the colour spectrum, was disappointed that there was work to be done.

4) When first mentioned on the phone, she quickly interrupted me to declare that she thought she was Orange. Just like that!!! Trying to tell her more was of no use. She would not listen and suggested that I go ahead with the assessment before she would even see the cards. When I finally got her to sort the picture cards she visually scanned them quickly and again declared “It’s Orange, I already told you”. When I mentioned that there were several more steps (i.e. other dimensions) she rolled her eyes and grudgingly went through the process. In the end I ended up having to complete the score sheet for her while she demanded to know whether we were done finally and “could we go to that movie now”.  Oh, in the meantime, she also managed to select a colour for me.

M's Face 2011 ParkMichael Tudor M.Ed is a Personality Dimensions® Master Trainer who has been involved with Personality Dimensions® from its inception in 2003. Together with his partner Larry Konyu (also a Personality Dimensions® Master Trainer) he is the author of Differentiated Instruction: Personality Dimensions and Learning Styles and creator of the DVD, The Lighter Side of Talking In Colour.

As president of Kondor Enterprises and a Level 3 Master Trainer, Michael conducts Personality Dimensions® workshops for high schools, universities and the corporate sector. He also leads Level 1 and 2 Personality Dimensions® certification programs about throughout the year.

Visit Michael’s website at www.kondor.ca, or connect with him at michaeltudor@rogers.com.

Personality Dimensions® Statistics

PD Stats Robot (Patent Pending)
PD Stats Robot (Patent Pending)

It’s that time of year again when the PD Stats Robot (patent pending) finally gets to take a rest after crunching a year’s worth of Personality Dimensions® workshop statistics.  The PD Stats Robot and the rest of the staff at Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc. would like to thank all of the Certified Trainers who took the time to send in their workshop statistics over the past year.  Collecting workshop statistics allows us to do further research on the reliability and validity of Personality Dimensions®.  If you look at the Primary Colour Breakdowns over the past 11 years, you will notice very little change with them over time.  Full statistics for the Canadian market, including this year’s are published every year in July and are posted at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/published-statistics

Collecting workshop statistics also helps us in creating new products.  For example, the job categories found in Career Dimensions™ were taken directly from the statistics reported to us by Certified Trainers. Your statistics also helped us in developing PD for Youth™.

We ask that every time you conduct an Introductory or Application Session that your keep track of your participants’ Primary Colour Preference, and Introversion/Extraversion preference.  You can find a form on the disk included with your Building Blocks/Manual to do this.  Statistics can then be faxed in to 905-760-0113, or emailed to stats@clsr.ca.  You can also submit your statistics through the web at: http://www.personalitydimensions.com/submit-your-statistics.

Once received at our office, our PD Stats Robot (patent pending) diligently processes and categorizes every number and colour submitted!  Also remember to submit your statistics even if you are administering Personality Dimensions® Online.  Remember that the assessment component isn’t the final word on an individual’s primary colour, especially if scores are close; clarification also comes from the Brightening Group exercises in a workshop.

Personality Dimensions® – Greetings from Hong Kong

It seems like yesterday when I delivered my very first Personality Dimensions® workshop in Hong Kong in July 2005 at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Continuing Education Program!  From then onward, we started training qualified Personality Dimensions®  Trainers in Hong Kong, and translating the materials into Chinese.  To date, we are an active network of 1,171 Level 1 Trainers and 53 Level 2 Facilitators in Hong Kong, Mainland China, and Macau!  We have developed the Chinese Participant pack (which is translated from the English Basic version), Chinese Dimension Cards, Chinese Picture Card and Poster Card, Chinese Career Dimensions, and Personality Dimensions® Manual and Building Blocks.

2016-06-09 20.40.23We held our very first Talking in Colour on January 23, 2016 which was well attended by trainers, and we decided we should continue this tradition so that the trainers have a platform to share their experiences and learn about new Personality Dimensions®  materials.

Stay tuned for the pre-order of Chinese PD for Youth.   We have just completed the translation of the PD for Youth Dimension and Picture Cards, PD for Youth Participant Pack, and PD for Youth Power Point Presentation CD.   We will be posting the link for pre-ordering in the next week or two!   The items will be offers at 30% discount during the pre-order period.  We have also begun the translation of the 2nd edition of the Personality Dimensions® Manual and Building Blocks.  Last but not least, we are working on the development of the Chinese PD-Online system.  We encountered major programming problems, which delayed our launch in the beginning of 2016.  We have to painfully decide to scrap the whole system and start from scratch again.  The good news is we have found a great programmer, who is working on the system as we speak.  The expected delivery date of the Chinese PD- Online system is October 2016.  We will keep you posted of any new developments.

Please feel free to drop me a line or two…or drop by when you venture out to Hong Kong!

Have a great summer!

 

Angela ShikAngela Shik, PhD MSW is a PD Master Trainer the Director of Dr Motivate  – Distributor of Personality Dimensions materials in Hong Kong, Mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan.  She can be reached at angela@drmotivate.com.  Her office is at Level 15 Langham Place, 8 Argyle Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Personality Dimensions® – Certificate of Attendance

PD Certificate of attendanceWe asked … and you answered! Yes, you wanted a “certificate of attendance” that certified Personality Dimensions Certified Trainers® can provide for your workshop attendees and we have one available.

Check out http://www.personalitydimensions.com/additional-resources to see what we’ve come up with. It is modifiable – you can either print out and hand write in the name of the participant and the date, then sign each certificate or you can create a file that you can modify to include the name of the participant and date in a pre-printed format, then print out each certificate and sign them personally.

We included a brief overview of some of the key points that are covered in an introductory Personality Dimensions® workshop and that we felt would add value to the certification if it was part of an employment portfolio.

Rather than have the certificate generally available to all who might visit the website, you must request that the file be sent to you. It will only, of course, be sent to Personality Dimensions Certified Trainers.

Keep your comments and suggestions coming … we listen!

Personality Dimensions® – Happy Canada Day!

Happy-Canada-Day-2015-1

Happy Canada Day from all the staff at Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc. – Personality Dimensions’ publisher.  Our office will close at 3:30pm EST (thanks boss!), and will reopen Monday July 4th.  Have a safe and happy long weekend!

Personality Dimensions® – Otto Kroeger

As many of you know, I have a long history of working with type instruments and have had the pleasure of learning from a variety of learned and interesting type professionals over the past 40 years. Few, however, reach the category of super presenter and among those leading stars one shines the brightest – and if you have every had the pleasure of meeting and learning from this person you will know immediately who I am referring to — Otto Kroeger.

Hile Rutledge worked with Otto for many years at OKA and he recently shared about Otto as the Teacher Showman – a description that, even if you never knew Otto, I am sure you will agree with once you read what Hile wrote. My thanks to Hile, and everyone at OKA, for allowing us to share this article with you.

~Denise Hughes, Director – Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc.

 

Ott-presentation-288x197The Teacher Showman — An Otto Kroeger Remembrance

When I was a kid, I could not decide if I wanted to be a teacher or an actor. Teachers seemed to have a great and important gig, but then I saw Paul Newman and Steve McQueen in The Towering Inferno, and acting seemed like the better way to go. In high school and college I did some acting and taught and tutored as well–trying both activities on for size, but I was thrust into the post-college, “get to work” world still not knowing which path I wanted to take—the classroom or the stage. It was not until I met and experienced Otto Kroeger a few years later that I discovered that this was a false choice. If you teach and train correctly, the classroom and stage converge, and you become a teacher showman.

An accomplished and enthusiastic actor/performer himself (Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof and the King in the The King and I were his two favorite roles), Otto taught me plenty about the wisdom of the stage and how it contributes to effective training. These seven lessons have become standard practice at OKA—a critical part of the OKA experience, central both to how we teach and how we craft and mold new trainers. The following insights I learned and developed from working with Otto Kroeger, the master teacher showman:

 

Know Your Lines

I saw Otto smoothly step in many times when he was co-training to redirect the answer to a question, inject some energy, to press re-set on the mood or in some other way steer the audience’s focus. He was able to do this by knowing the content and the goals of the design in such great detail. Training is not about merely transferring facts—it is about facilitating an experience.

Know your part—backwards and forwards. You never hit the boards and face an audience before you learn the lines—and not just your lines but those of everyone who takes the stage. Even if you improvise, facilitate and let your performance stay in the moment, the freedom of such performances is only workable when you first have totally immersed yourself in the part as written. The same applies to effective training. Know your subject matter, your design, your transitions, where it gets challenging and where it gets fun. Know the laugh lines and the parts of the presentation that punch and jab a bit. Know the arc and flow – the music – of your training event.

 

Fill the Space

Otto towers in my memory, but in reality he was not a big man. While he always carried some weight, he was only about 5’9’’. But he knew how to fill a stage. No one could play Tevye or the King of Siam who did not know how to use his body and voice to fill not just the stage, but our imaginations. Great trainers and great actors have this in common.

Otto taught me to use the whole room—visit each corner in setting up and processing exercises, answering questions, and telling stories. Make the whole room part of the action space. Break that fourth wall, and make the audience/participants part of the performance. Take your storytelling up a notch with gesture and animation, and fill up your training space.

 

Play to the Back Row

Otto once lamented with a mix of regret and irritation that a participant in the back of the room seemed to be dozing off in one of his presentations. That the presentation had been a keynote to over 800 people who had eagerly awarded him a standing ovation made little difference. Otto always played to the back row, which means he paid attention to the person least connected, least engaged or furthest away from the action.

I always give focused attention to the sight lines and room atmosphere for those in the worst seats in the room. Do they have obstructed views; can they hear everything; can I and the rest of the group see and hear them, and do they get as much of my energy as the folks at the front table? Every seat in the house deserves the same great show.

 

Move with Purpose

Otto understood that his words and voice were only part of what he was communicating. Over twenty years in the pulpit as a Lutheran minister taught him this as well. Gestures, walking, and movement were powerful tools to harness.

OKA teaches the trainers it trains to move (fill the space) but to do so with intention and direction. Taking a few steps in one direction or another could reinforce a content point, personally connect to a participant, grab or re-direct attention, offer visual variety, or any number of things. A good trainer—like a good performer—gives thought to movement and intentionally selects the physical presentation that best serves the lesson.

 

Control the Stage

As a student of good acting and performing, Otto knew Anton Chekov’s urging for effective stage dressing. If there is a candlestick on the mantle when the curtain goes up, that candlestick should be used in some way before the curtain comes down.

OKA’s translation of this theater principle is keeping the training room focused, neat and clean. Use plenty of visuals and training support tools, but as soon as the point is made or the topic changes, clean up, organize, pare down and focus your visuals. The only visuals participants should see are those that are still needed for support or reference. Good trainers, like good performers, control and organize their performance space.

 

Commit to the Part

Otto believed in Type, and he was equally committed to the human interaction lessons at the heart of the NTL training he designed and delivered, but he declined to train on a number of topics and tools over the years because he knew that to be believable, the performer must commit to his part. An actor should never take a part to which he/she cannot authentically commit.

If you don’t believe what you are saying, and if you have not integrated the material you are offering, you will not be seen as a trusted trainer/presenter. When you are watching a great performer, you never wonder if he or she believes what is being said or done—authenticity is core to a powerful performance or training.

 

Comedy Beats Tragedy

Otto died in 2013. That year’s Best Picture Academy Award winner was 12 Years a Slave. That same year, Despicable Me 2 (the Steve Carell comedy) was one of the biggest money makers—earning more than 7 times what the gritty Oscar winner brought in. While there are many provocative and thought-provoking conclusions that can be drawn from this, the important one here is simple and powerful- people are generally more drawn to comedy than tragedy. Hamlet is amazing, but Much Ado About Nothing is more fun.

Otto was always interested in making people laugh. Facts need to be conveyed, but when they come clothed in a funny story, they are both enjoyed and remembered. Having fun and laughing are common experiences at an OKA event. Keep them laughing to keep them learning.

 

HileOKA President Hile Rutledge is one of America’s most respected trainers in both the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) and the EQ-i® (Emotional Intelligence) assessment instruments.  He is the author of the MBTI® Introduction Workbook, the EQ Workbook, the Four temperaments Workbook and co-author of the best-seller Type Talk at Work, as well as the creator of OKA online tutorials, videos and many other publications and training tools.  Hile’s primary area of expertise is the practical use of assessment tools in the development of self-awareness and improved self-management for leaders, teams and organizations.  www.oka-online.com

Personality Dimensions® – Congratulations!

Congratulations to the latest class of Personality Dimensions Level I and Level II trainers.  Master trainers Michael Tudor and Larry Konyu shared their years of experience with this group to get them ready to go out on their own!  Find out more about Michael and Larry and the training they offer at their website at www.kondor.ca.


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