The First Nations Medicine Wheel Brings Understanding to African Students

As readers of this blog know, I’ve been looking for ways to build a bridge between Personality Dimensions® and First Nations people in a way that respects their culture.

Some while ago Terry Maynard (PD Level II) and during that conversation, I mentioned my interest in developing materials that would make a natural bridge between First Nations peoples and Personality Dimensions®. I was surprised to learn that Terry had already done some work with a group of aboriginal youth. I don’t know why I was surprised at this; Terry’s passion is for working with youth and he always seems to be doing creative and innovative things to engage them. In addition to the materials that he had prepared to work with the youth, he also sent me an article that I want to share with you – “The First Nations’ Medicine Wheel Brings Understanding to African Students.” Yes, that’s right; no wonder I have trouble getting him on the phone sometimes – I usually expect that he’s somewhere with a group of youth in Northern Ontario; it seems that he was recently in Africa!

~Denise Hughes

 

“As a young eagle which direction would you fly, east, north, west or south?

Image1This was a question posed by Joesph McQuabbie, Chief of Parry Sound Ojibwa. Joseph was in my Employment and Career Counselling program at George Brown College and was asked to share how First Nation Elders counsel their young people in career directions. This question was part of an hour-long story describing the four cardinal directions of the First Nation’s Medicine Wheel. It was a fantastic contribution to our class on Diversity.

Years later, as a Group Facilitator for an Outdoor Leadership Camp, I was again exposed to the Medicine Wheel. This time by my supervisor, who specialized in Shamanic Teachings, and used the Medicine Wheel as a team building and leadership development tool.

It was then that I recognized a striking similarity between the Medicine Wheel and the four personality styles of Personality Dimensions®. What amazed me was that the Medicine Wheel was developed thousands of years before the first European record of personalities by Hippocrates in 400B.C.

People new to personality styles often have a challenge remembering the different styles. However, with the styles associated to a cardinal direction and earth element, it seems easier to remember and relate. For example, I was asked to lead a Personality for Career Direction workshop with a group of Swahili-speaking female students at a secondary school on Mt. Kilimanjaro, Africa. Not only was the language translation a challenge, but introducing the concept of individual personalities was also difficult. This was a culture with a community perspective and the idea of individual personalities was foreign.

Figure 1
Terry Maynard facilitating the Medicine Wheel of Personalities

I presented personalities through a modified medicine wheel made on the ground with rope and rocks. The four directions were Kijiji’s (Villages) each living out a behaviour of one of the four personality styles. After hearing the translator share Joseph McQuabbie’s story of the Young Eagle students were asked to “fly” to the village most like them:

  • Kijiji of the East, where people think up new ideas
  • Kijiji of the North, where people are consistent and responsible
  • Kijiji of the West, where people are busy building things
  • Kijiji of the South, where people care for one another
Figure 2
Students reading attributes of their Kijiji (village)

Upon arriving at the villages the students would read a short list of attributes for the villagers and either remain at that village or fly to another. Once they settled on a village they were given a list of occupations related to that village. The occupations suited to each village were the lists of careers from the Career Dimensions component of Personality Dimensions®. With permission from CLSR, I had the list translated into Swahili and modified to make the occupations relevant to Africa.

The students loved the Medicine Wheel activity. For the first time in 10 years of working with these students it became obvious that they were starting to dream about their future. Instead of fixing their career idea on what they were exposed to (doctors, teachers, nurses), they now dreamt of new possibilities such as computer technician, truck driver, helicopter pilot, even self-employment.

Figure 3
Senior students of Makomu Secondary School, Mt. Kilimanjaro

There is no doubt in my mind that the First Nation’s Medicine Wheel is an effective method of presenting personalities to people of diverse cultures and backgrounds.

(Photos courteously provided by ABCD – Art Building Children’s Dreams, Mt. Albert, Ontario www.abcdrams.ca)

 

By: Terry Maynard

terryAbout the author: After a successful 10-year career in corporate training for one of Canada’s top banks, Terry started Unlimited Worth. Since 1995, Terry has specialized in helping young people from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds develop their leadership skills in his Outdoor Therapy programs. You can reach Terry at terry@unlimitedworth.com.

Personality Dimensions® on TV: The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

It’s been a while, so I figured it’s time for another installment of PD on TV!  Like thousands of other people, I cut the cord on my cable a while ago, so I am not as up-to-date on what’s been on the air recently. Either way, as someone who lives and breathes Personality Dimensions®, my Personality Radar is always on – trying to get a read on people.

Fresh Prince
Photo credit: IMDB.com

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air was an instant hit when it first came out and launched the acting career of Will Smith. It had humour, drama, and some unforgettable dance moves! It was a staple for me when I was in high school back in the 90’s. Watching the reruns every day after school held me over until the new episodes came out.

After looking way back to my teenage years, and talking with a few friends, here’s my take on some of characters from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air

 

 

will smith
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Will – Extraverted Resourceful Orange

 

The quick-witted rebellious Will Smith (character, not the actor) is best described as an Extroverted Resourceful Orange. Will is the life of a party, and needs to be around people to stay energised. He is quick on his feet, acts well under pressure, and can talk himself out of any situation… except for that one time. He has a natural instinct for opportunity and needs the freedom to go after it. “So you’re telling me to disobey Uncle Phil’s orders, ah-well won’t be the first time… PSSH possy out.”

 

 

Uncle Phil2
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Uncle Phil – Introverted Organized Gold

 

The dependable family man Phillip Banks (AKA Uncle Phil) is always at odds with Will. As an Introverted Organized Gold, he values his personal downtime and routine. As a lawyer, and later a judge, he respects authority and process. At the same time, family is one of the most important things to him. He worked hard to get where he is so his kids could have more opportunities and he accepted Will into the family as one of his own. Uncle Phil has helped Will out of a bind on more than one occasion, and supported him through difficult/confusing times with his own father.

 

Aunt Viv
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Aunt Vivian – Extraverted Authentic Blue

Vivian Banks’ (AKA Aunt Viv) nature can be summed up by Uncle Phil: “Oh please, Vivian. You’d believe the boy if he said he was a famous rapper and his album had just gone platinum!” As an Extraverted Authentic Blue she is a great motivator and recognises the talents of people around her. Relationships and people are important to her; it was at her insistence that Will came to stay with them after he had troubles in Philadelphia.  Aunt Viv likes maintaining harmony, so she gets to be the peacemaker between Uncle Phil, Carlton, and Will.  She was heavily involved with the human rights movement in her youth, and is the one person in the house that accepts Jazz for who he is.

 

Carleton Banks
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Carlton – Extraverted Organized Gold/Inquiring Green

Carlton, much like his cousin, is also the life of a party… but in different ways. He is completely energized by having people around, and has been known to break into dance when his self-esteem is high. He is highly rational, strategic, accountable, respectful, trusting, and loyal like most Extraverted Organized Golds/Inquiring Greens. His logical approach and strong sense of justice make Carlton often side with his father in arguments with Will.  Sometimes he lets his practicality get in the way; once saying “Dad, don’t do anything stupid! You haven’t updated your will yet.” When it comes down to it, he deeply cares for his family, and will do anything to protect him. Despite their many differences, Carlton sees and treats Will as a brother.

 

Ashley Banks
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Ashley – Extraverted Resourceful Orange

Ashley Banks starts off in the series as the quiet, reserved younger sister, not at all looking like an Extraverted Resourceful Orange; but comes into her core personality with the help of her older cousin Will.  He recognizes that she isn’t happy with the overly structured and methodically planned, quiet life that her parents chose for her, albeit with good intentions.  She is happiest and energized by being around people. From the time she skipped out on practicing classical music to listen to Will’s Walkman, to when she dropped out of private school and enrolled in a public high school, it’s clear that Ashley needs to make her own decisions to be successful in life.  She takes calculated risks like pursuing her music career, and moving across the country to study the arts.

 

geoffrey butler
Photo credit: IMDB.com

Geoffrey – Introverted Resourceful Orange/Inquiring Green

Geoffrey Butler threw me a curveball. While at work he comes across as an Introverted Inquiring Green – methodical, logical, and quality conscious. His retorts are quick, but well thought out and clever. When you look at his past, you see a very different side of him that appears Introverted Resourceful Orange. He shows his adaptability, desire for change and variety through his past professions; Oxford graduate, Olympic runner, butler to Led Zeppelin, Greco-Roman wrestler, and sparring partner to Chuck Norris. This could be a case of a strongly developed contextual self because of his chosen career, while still hanging on to his core self. Regardless of which colour preference he is drawing from, he needs his personal time to recharge. At the end of the day he returns to his room to recharge with his own interests.

So, do you remember watching The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air? Do you think my Personality Rader was tuned-in correctly? What about some of the others like Hillary, Jazz, and the second Aunt Viv? Leave your comments below and let me know what you think.

By: Brad Whitehorn

 

Brad

Brad Whitehorn – BA, CCDP is the Sales & Marketing Coordinator at CLSR Inc.  He was thrown into the career development field headfirst after completing a Communications degree in 2005, and hasn’t looked back!  Since then, Brad has worked on the development, implementation and certification for various career and personality assessments (including Personality Dimensions®), making sure that Career Development Practitioners get the right tools to best serve their clients

Relating Personality Dimensions® to First Nations Teachings

“First Nations understood personalities 3,000 years before the first European documentation in 400BC”

This statement seemed to grip the attention of a First Nations group of workshop participants. As part of the Personality Dimensions® introduction and history, I show how the First Nation’s Medicine Wheel described four types of people very similar to the styles described by Personality Dimensions®. Including this connection at the beginning of the workshop helped the participants quickly understand and remember the four colour styles. Within minutes the group was “talking in colour” as if it were second nature.

I made it clear to the group that I am not a First Nations descendant, nor have any authority regarding First Nation’s teaching. I explained that I wanted to show how First Nations were advanced in the understanding of personality over modern discoveries.

Here’s how I made the connection…

 

The Four Villages

Instead of introducing Personality Dimensions® through the Party Game exercise that uses the four Poster Cards, I used summaries of the four villages (personalities) from the First Nation’s Medicine Wheel. Here are the four Village Posters:

 

 

I asked the group to stand by the Village Poster that they relate to the most or find most interesting. After participants explained their attraction to each poster I asked them to take the poster from the wall revealing the associated Personality Dimensions® Poster Card, then I introduce each of the four personality preferences.

 

 

 

 

 

History

As a transition to the temperament history slide, I share the observation that First Nations observed four primary types of people in their Medicine Wheels 3,000 years before Hippocrates.History-of-PD

 

Circle of Self

I adapted the Circle of Self activity to create a tent card using Medicine Wheels to create pie-chart representations of the participant’s Personality Dimensions® Scores. This provided an on-going connection between their Personality Dimensions® results and the Medicine Wheel.

Circle-of-Self

 

Personality Mastery

One of the Medicine Wheel’s teachings that I value very highly is the importance of being aware of all the Cardinal Directions (personality styles) and being able to move in and out of these directions when needed for the greater good of the community. In relating this to Personality Dimensions®, I used the term “Personality Mastery.” A fellow facilitator, trained in Shamanic Ways, believes that when a person possesses Personality Mastery they become like an Elder in their community.

The group seemed to embrace personality styles very easily by visioning the four cardinal directions in the Medicine Wheel. The quest for Personality Mastery also helped to avoid “colour bashing” since it was part of their culture to respect all the personalities (villages).

 

Conclusion

If used respectfully I think the Medicine Wheel is a natural interface for Personality Dimensions® in First Nations communities. Even when I use the Medicine Wheel story with non-First Nations groups, giving it proper respect, I find it makes a tangible connection to the four Personality Dimensions® styles, something very helpful for the kinaesthetic learners in my workshops.

By: Terry Maynard

terryTerry has over 20 years of experience in delivering personality styles workshops in Corporate Training,  Human Resources, and Youth Leadership settings. Through hard work, a relentless drive to create, implement and improve effective techniques, Terry uses his unique capabilities in learning systems and understanding of people to harness the “unlimited worth” in people. Get in touch with Terry through his website at www.unlimitedworth.com.

Personality Dimensions® – “oh my goodness, this is why you do this during a meeting,”

“The first 10 minutes of the Personality Dimensions® workshop helped me understand some things about you that I haven’t understood for the last two years.”

 “Oh my goodness, this is why you do this when we are in the middle of our meetings.”

 “I now understand how we are different, but we are different because we are unique.”

I have been facilitating Personality Dimensions® workshops for the last 11 years in the private and public sectors as well as youth-based organizations and in the education system. The above statements came up just recently in a workshop I lead at my workplace. My favorite is the second one; in it my manager at the time had a breakthrough moment about our relationship. During meetings I would typically stop and ask questions and this would always confuse my manager. He wondered why I was asking questions because, in his mind, there wasn’t a need for questions. Once it was clear that we were different colours, and what that meant, he understood this trait of mine.

Let me also describe to you the circumstances of the first and the third quotes. The first quote highlighted how another workshop participant connected with their peers. There was always conflict as that individual just couldn’t understand how someone that they had been working with for the past two years could be so fundamentally different from them. When the assessments were completed, and they realized that one individual was a Resourceful Orange and the rest of their peers were Organized Golds, a lot of light was shed on how the team was structured and some of the conflict that had arisen because of how each colour would complete their task.

Personality Dimensions® helps us understand who we are and how to celebrate our uniqueness’s by showcasing our strengths and providing an understanding for where there are opportunities for growth. As I mentioned earlier, I have used Personality Dimensions® in youth-based organizations, within the education system, and in the public and private sectors. Out of those areas, the greatest impact was on the private sector. There the need for immediate return on investment (ROI) is top of mind. If the companies that I provided the training for had not seen that immediate ROI, the program would have quickly been discontinued. Rather, after the initial 3 hour workshops (the self-assessments were completed online before the workshop) there were multiple applications workshops to help support everyone from management to front-line employees develop practices that would best serve their customers – and increase sales.

As a result of the “oh my goodness, this is why you do this during a meeting,” realization, meetings are now structured quite a bit differently. Rather than just being a download of information, the “why?” question is addressed either beforehand or early in the meeting. This has built stronger relationships within the company, meetings have greater impact and objectives are more readily achieved. And all of this was a result of the work we did with Personality Dimensions®. Now an effort is made to ensure that all four colours are represented at each meeting, with the recognition that this represents not only the employee-employer relationship but the customer experience as well

Personality Dimensions® has helped me shape how I have worked with others because I can understand who they are and how to celebrate their uniqueness within the workshops.  I truly believe you can have the same experience.

 

drew fockler professionalDrew Fockler is the Founder of Cross Canada Corporate Services where he is a Corporate Trainer & Consultant. Drew supports all levels of leadership within an organization to grow their leadership and HR skills.  He is a Level II Personality Dimensions® Facilitator, Certified Life Coach, received awards for his contributions towards the LGBT community and Toastmasters Leadership for British Columbia in 2017.

Drew holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts & Science, a Master’s Degree in Education and is in his final year of study to complete a Doctorate of Education from Western University.

Drew is also running Personality Dimensions® Level I Certification classes across Canada in 2019.  Visit http://www.personalitydimensions.com/training-dates to see when he’s going to be in your city.

Personality Dimensions® – A Taste of Colour in Hong Kong

A Taste of Colour at the Consulate General of Canada in Hong Kong

cof

It was a pleasant surprise when I received a call from the Consulate General of Canada in Hong Kong requesting for a 1.5-hour training on Personality Dimensions® during their immigration section annual retreat.  This would be their very first exposure to Personality Dimensions®, and they are eager to learn what Personality Dimensions® is about.

Since we did not have enough time to conduct a full Personality Dimensions® assessment, and the group size of 70 was too big for a regular workshop, I decided to deliver the ‘Taste of Colour” exercise instead. The organizers were worried that 1.5 hours of training without a break in between would be too heavy for their staff.  Before they know it, the 1.5 hours were over, and they found themselves asking for more! We all had a wonderful time playing People Bingo and getting a taste of Inquiring Green, Authentic Blue, Organized Gold, and Resourceful Orange. We were joined by The Consul General for most of the training.

Consulate General of Canada in Hong Kong Banner

The feedback from the group after the training was positive, and I hope Personality Dimensions® will gain more popularity in staff training and retreats at the Canadian Consulate in Hong Kong and beyond!

Angela ShikAngela W. Y. Shik, MSc, MA, MSW, PhD is a Personality Dimensions® Master Trainer, Director, Dr Motivate, Distributor of Personality Dimensions® training materials and programs in Hong Kong, Macau, People’s Republic of China, and Taiwan.

Contact: www.drmotivate.com  info@drmotivate.com  +852-3958-2338

Personality Dimensions® Facilitator; Dual Role, Dual Responsibility

Ramping up your effectiveness as a Personality Dimensions® facilitator requires continuously building upon two competencies:

  • A solid knowledge of Personality Dimensions® theory and application, and
  • Effective facilitation skills.

These are two very different skill sets! We’ve all been to lectures or workshops with speakers who were absolutely solid subject matter experts; well respected, well written, but were less adept at communicating, teaching or running an interactive and engaging session.

You may have been to a workshop (on any topic) with a talented facilitator who respected all participants, accounted for differing learning styles and personality types, managed time well, used various and interesting learning methods, communicated artfully with the audience, but fell a little short on actual subject matter expertise. Of course you want to fall into neither of these categories!

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing…

You may have attended a Personality Dimensions® workshop and fell in love with the whole thing, as I did. You then decided to add it to your tool kit for helping others understand themselves and others better and all the other good stuff that comes along with it. Awesome! Be sure to continue your PD education. Here are a few ideas:

  • Become a certified Personality Dimensions® trainer
  • Read everything you can on temperament theory and application
  • Attend/participate in your Personality Dimensions® colleagues’ workshops, and see what they do/don’t do
  • Strengthen your understanding of Introversion and Extraversion and how these play out in the colour groups
  • Share your challenges and brilliant moments with other Personality Dimensions® facilitators
  • Attend professional development events to broaden your knowledge and expertise

Be sure not to go along with (or inadvertently foster) your participants’ assumptions or stereotypes of any of the colour groups. Arm yourself with examples of non-stereotypical folks; for example, a flexible Gold, a fast-paced Green, a quiet Orange or a business-like Blue.

By: Carole Cameron

 

caroleCarole is the President of Creative Performance Solutions, which specializes in providing customized training design and facilitation, focused in the areas of management effectiveness, communication skills and team building. Her workshops receive rave reviews for providing powerful learning experiences, and are remembered for being positive, interactive, practical, and fun!  Carole is the author of the critically acclaimed book, SPLASH An Introvert’s Guide to Being Seen, Heard and Remembered

Personality Dimensions® – Meet the Master Trainers

I didn’t meet Larry Konyu until Personality Dimensions® was well and truly launched and when I did he radiated his Inquiring Green preference. Since that time Larry’s considerable experiences have honed his understanding of Personality Dimensions® and it has been wonderful to see him grow and truly embrace all of the colours. Larry is one of those quiet resource people who I know I can count on to think about and respond to any questions or thoughts that I may need to bounce off someone with his background and if he suggests something that needs doing I know to pay attention; Larry does not speak without first reasoning through the process himself. It is my pleasure to consider him a colleague and a friend. Onward and upward ~ Denise

 

Here, in his own words …

L_Konyu6“It is an honour indeed to be a Level III Personality Dimensions® Master Trainer. Certifying others in Personality Dimensions® and facilitating introductory workshops have been one of the most rewarding and fulfilling experiences of my life.

A brief history:

After graduating from the University of Western Ontario with a B.Sc. in Computer Science and Mathematics, I worked for 10 years as a systems analyst and programmer with companies like Canada Life, Hudson’s Bay and the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. This gave me some valuable insight into the issues facing organizations today.

However I have always had a penchant for teaching. I spent the next two and a half decades teaching computer studies. Supervisory roles included being Chair of Computer Studies at Centennial College and Associate Dean, at Humber College in the School of Information Technology and Accounting.

These educational roles, and, no doubt, my Inquiring Green preference, led me to study the art of education at The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, which put me in touch with the latest in educational research. These courses helped me to understand the way people learn.

After retiring from a career in post-secondary education, I became certified in Personality Dimensions® and delivered hundreds of workshops to both business and education with a PD flavor.

I also use the Personality Dimensions® tool to provide bereavement support as a facilitator with Bereaved Families of Ontario – Toronto. This experience required me to use all of my Authentic Blue; something I was not used to and, for many reasons, reluctant to access.

In addition, my volunteer work provided the opportunity to Chair the Education committee for the Rainbow Health Network. I helped develop and deliver Diversity Training workshops to various groups in the medical establishment to heighten the awareness of LGBTQ issues.

Upon reflection, it is so interesting that Personality Dimensions® has not only provided me with a renewed career direction but it has been personally enlightening at the same time.  I see myself and others in such a different way. I feel truly complete as a person and much happier as a result.  Personality Dimensions® stresses that Inquiring Greens tend to be the most skeptical of the temperaments. But I am here to tell you that I am hooked. In my earlier life as an Inquiring Green with second colour Organized Gold I expected others to achieve my exacting standards and goals. Now, I truly understand the excellence that others bring and can relax. What a relief!!!”

—-

An avid runner, Larry and has completed several marathons and half marathons. He runs about 10 races a year. He is the co-author of Differentiated Instruction: Personality Dimensions® and Learning Styles and is currently working on developing “A Taste of Colour” introduction to Personality Dimensions® for keynote speakers and “The impact of second colour on first.”

Degrees: B.Sc., (Mathematics and Computer Science), M.Ed. (Measurement, Evaluation and Computer Applications) and Certifications/Qualifications: Fellow Life Management Institute; Certified fitness instructor; Grief facilitator and Trainer: Bereaved Families of Ontario.

Larry can be reached at lkonyu@rogers.com or through his website www.kondor.ca.

Personality Dimensions® – The School Bell Rings and The Kids are Off!

cls-4225501September starts off with a bang as parents juggle school schedules, organized programs and finding valuable family time – not to mention dealing with how each of their offspring react to these changes. And often the parents we meet have no idea how helpful it can be to understand their kid’s temperament at this crucial time of the year.

To help parents, we have listened to kids’ conversations, observed kids over the years and even asked our own panel of students (a.k.a. our grandchildren) how they approach September. Here’s hoping this will help!

Our Resourceful Oranges may be feeling the crunch ––  they realize the freedom of summer holidays is over. Fall routines kick in fast and may serve to make these usually high energy Resourceful Orange kids feel stifled. They sometimes risk breaking the rules that seem so difficult to follow and a little overwhelming to our adventurers, although they may tell their parents they were simply bending the rules a little! Their spontaneous, in-the-moment way of acting can be very infectious and other kids may join in the fun, so making new friends, while continuing to hang out with old friends, comes as second nature to these children. They will tell you how great a class is when it includes group work, entertaining activities, little sitting in one place and lots of hands-on “doing.” Keeping these energetic Resourceful Oranges active after school can be a handful for some parents, who have told us that the secret is to get them involved in sports, drama, or music once the school day is done, and if there is a competition involved, all the better for these kids who want to win!

Who loves to learn? Inquiring Greens of course!! However, they can be their own worse enemy when it comes to submitting school work that they deem to be imperfect. This is especially true if it’s in a subject that they have an intense interest in and they think that their work could be better if only they had more time. Appearing incompetent stresses them out, yet so does feeling unchallenged by the work. While they may at first seem very serious to other kids, these Inquiring Greens may have a wry sense of humour and can often make others laugh with their witty remarks, albeit sometimes not without a little sarcasm thrown in for good measure.  An appealing class setting for these logical, objective kids includes one that meets their high expectations, especially the teacher! Being allowed to work independently, and on materials of their own choosing, excites these kids, although group work with classmates who can discuss the issues intelligently can be inspirational too. After school activities for these kids often includes exploring ideas and subjects of interest to them, perhaps alone, or with a small circle of close friends who enjoy the same things.

What about our Organized Golds? Getting back to routines, schedules and feeling a part of the school community makes them happy! They may be a little apprehensive though, if it means attending a new school and having to make new friends this year.  These kids usually respect their teachers, especially if there is a set of rules for them to follow and everyone is treated fairly. Their idea of a wonderful classroom experience will also include a teacher who not only is in control of the class but also provides clear directions to follow so that the Organized Golds can get their work done quickly and efficiently. They generally enjoy working in groups, if all members stay on task and complete their portions according to the rules. Organized Golds often create a pro-and-con list to logically and objectively make decisions. Once they do so, they may then create a list and set priorities to get everything done efficiently and on time, if not early. After school activities for the competitive Organized Golds may include team sports or school bands and they like coming home to their own neat, tidy room.

Finally, our Authentic Blues look forward to meeting up with their friends once again and catching up with everyone about their summer. They will worry about being put into a different class than their friends and certainly will not like any kind of conflict in the classroom, often choosing to uphold the underdog in any stand off.  They may in fact help mediate any issues just to “keep the peace.” The one thing they don’t particularly enjoy is competition; they don’t understand the necessity of winners and losers. What makes these artistic, non-conformists happiest in a classroom? First, they appreciate a teacher who is personable, inclusive and caring; secondly, a comfortable, warm, inviting, attractive environment where they can work in groups and socialize. If allowed to use their imagination and creativity they will work hard for their teacher and for their grades. These are the kids who don’t just look at the mark on the report card, but hang on every word the teachers say about them and their work. For the Authentic Blues after school activities must include people they enjoy being around; it may not be so much about what they do, but who is with them.

 

Kate&WayneKate and Wayne, authors of Great Parenting Skills for Navigating your Kid’s Personality are partners in life who enjoy collaborating on professional projects like writing books and running workshops! Kate Jones, B.A. (Psychology/English), M.Ed. is an accomplished speaker, facilitator, coach, and author, specializing in temperament, and now, in positivity.  She worked both in the educational and human resources sectors before launching her own business over a decade ago.  Wayne Jones, M.Ed. is an experienced educator, having taught students from kindergarten through secondary school, as well as adult education.  He has been a classroom teacher, department head, Principal, and a faculty advisor with Nipissing University. They can be reached through their website http://skills4people.com/

 

Special Bonus

As a bonus to the Personality Dimensions® In Action blog readers and subscribers, Career/LifeSkills Resources Inc. is offering a 25% discount off the retail price of Great Parenting Skills for Navigating your Kid’s Personality until the end of September. Buy one for yourself, or give one as a gift to friends with kids! Use coupon code “backtoschool” when checking out at www.clsr.ca or call 1-877-680-0200 to place your order today!

Personality Dimensions® – I Have Bought In, aka Climbing Trees

dsc_0066During a train-the-trainer session a few years ago I had the opportunity to meet an interesting new facilitator.  At the end of the three days of training, he came up to me and said, “I see where this is going, but I just haven’t bought in yet.” He is a high Inquiring Green and I could see that he needed more time to process the information and see it play out in real time before he was going to commit to the model.

A few months later I received a phone call from him.  He started the conversations with, “I have bought in.” I immediately knew who it was … even though he didn’t say so … and couldn’t wait to hear the story that I was sure came with the conversion. This is what he told me.

‘I am working with a youth group. It is a week long program and we spend the first part of the Monday morning going over the agenda, general housekeeping issues, etc. We were scheduled to do the Personality Dimensions® workshop that afternoon. At the lunch break we were all outside; it was a nice day and there is a picnic table under a tree close by so everyone went there to eat lunch.

Three of the young men were chatting in a group and I overheard one say,“Bet you I can climb this tree!” the other two started to laugh as the tree didn’t look like one that a teenager would be able to climb very high in.  There were a few, “Cannot!,” “Can so!” comments going back and forth.

At the other end of the picnic table two other participants sat listening to this conversation. They both looked at the tree, and the young man and started to talk about the likelihood of him being able to climb, how high he might be able to go, the actual weight each branch could hold, if he should climb close to the trunk, etc.

Two other participants looked worried that he might actually attempt the climb. They voiced their concern, “What if you get hurt?” and “You might fall!”

One other young woman felt it was import to remind them all, “We are only out here to have lunch. We aren’t allowed to climb trees.”

Well, of course the young man wasn’t to be put off so up he went. Higher and higher he climbed. The two who had been part of the original conversation encouraging him all the way, “Go! Go! Lookin’ good!  Keep going!”  The two young women who were so concerned for his safety watched on with concern etched on their faces and fear in their eyes. The young men on the other end of the table continued to watch in total fascination as he passed the point at which they felt he could climb no more. The woman concerned that tree climbing was not on the agenda ran over to the Facilitator in the hopes he would do something and make it all stop.

It was at that moment that our young tree climber lost his grip and came crashing down through the branches, bounced off the picnic table, landed hard on the grass and immediately jumped to his feet with the traditional cry of, “I’m ok! I’m ok!”

His two cohorts in crime were elated and whooped with joy; racing to him and thumping him on the back. All smiling broadly. The two young ladies rushed in saying, “Are you alright? Are you ok? You should lie down, you might have a concussion or a broken bone!” The two at the end of the picnic table didn’t even move, but were now comparing notes on why they thought he was able to climb even higher than anticipated and about how the branches worked to break his fall. Our young woman who had warned all this wasn’t a good idea in the first place stormed over to get her two cents in, “I told you we weren’t supposed to be climbing trees!! Are you trying to get us all in trouble?”

The facilitator, sitting back, made note of how each responded to the situation. Three Resourceful Oranges were involved in the climbing and the encouraging of it. Two Authentic Blues worried someone might get hurt.  Two Inquiring Greens analyzed the play-by-play. One Organized Gold tried to keep everyone on plan. He wrote down his findings and waited to see if these were truly the primary colours they discovered when they did Personality Dimension that afternoon and, of course, they were.

At the end of the week he called to report, “I have bought in.”

 

Karen KloibhoferKaren Kloibhofer, Level II Personality Dimensions® Trainer is a Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship Consultant with Fanshawe College with over 20 years in employability – helping match good employee candidates with the right mentor/employer.  She feels that for any career, and apprenticeship in particular, finding the right personality match between a mentor and the new employee is the key to a successful mentoring partnership.  www.karenkloibhofer.com

Personality Dimensions – What You See, What You Hear

Big-Group-of-PeopleMichael Tudor (Personality Dimensions® Master Trainer) had his class of Teacher Candidates at the University of Toronto complete the face to face Personality Dimensions® assessment. Michael then asked them to select someone they knew to do the assessment. Could they gain some insight about their subject’s top colour preference by either the way they responded to the request or while they were completing the assessment? To this end the teacher candidates were encouraged to pay attention to verbal and/or non-verbal cues.

They were asked to document their subject’s reactions under the title “What you see, what you hear.”

Here are some of the more telling, revealing and amusing responses…

Authentic Blue:

1) Eager and willing participant. Very attentive. Closed by saying: “I hope you get a good grade.”

2) He said “I would be more than happy to help you”. Very inviting and welcoming. Concerned with final score. At the end said “Oh is that all? Do you want me to help you by answering any other questions?

3) She asked if the questions were hard. Was worried about doing well.

4) Very interested in helping me with the assignment. Attentive and conscientious throughout the process. Was happy to connect with the Authentic Blue picture card.

Inquiring Green:

1) Asked a billion questions. Was impressed that I actually had background knowledge. Analysed every word and looked them up in the dictionary. Took the entire process very seriously.

2) Although at the outset my subject had no preliminary questions pertaining to the exercise, he did begin to analyse the validity of the assessment and my subjectivity in administering it. He questioned the ability of this assessment to accurately define who he is.

3) Questions as follows: “How long will this take? Do I really need to do this? Should I leave the TV on or off? Why Me? I don’t need a long explanation. Just get to the point”

4) Seriously examined the pictures on the cards for a very long time. Then uttered “This is so stupid. Someone associated a picture with a colour? I mean the organized gold card should be the colour green because green represents money (pointing at the dollar sign on the organized gold card). The green card should be brown or grey….. Why do psychologists major in this area if they can’t even get the colours right? Who are they to set such standards? “

5) “Do you think I know myself well enough to answer those questions truthfully and get accurate results?” When he was assured that this was a logically designed assessment, this seemed to assuage his anxiety about the prospect of having to reflect on his feelings

Organized Gold:

1) Took the assessment very seriously. Took time to rearrange the cards until he was satisfied with the results. Very concerned about performing the requirements to the best of his ability.

2) For the assessment to be completed, I had to schedule it ahead of time. In addition, the day before the assessment I was told that it had to be completed by a certain time because something else had been planned afterwards. Wanted no interruptions. Read all instructions twice. The common reaction to all the Resourceful Orange traits was “Absolutely not me.”

3) Followed my instructions to the letter. No indecision on which cards or words were preferred. Wanted all the numbers on the Traits and Characteristics pressure sensitive sheet to be written inside the boxes. Misplaced one number and requested a new assessment.

4) Very willing to assist. Asked the following ‘When are we going to do this? How long will it take? Scheduled time during second intermission of hockey game. Became annoyed when it took longer than expected and missed part of third period. Started whining “Can I watch TV now?

Resourceful Orange:

1) When approached about the assessment he said very little. During the assessment he just did what I asked him to do while stating that he hates following instructions. However very focused and calm despite the fact that we were in a noisy downtown bar where he was able to take a haul off his cigarette and a sip of his pint.

2) Interested at first. At times only physically present. Kept changing radio stations. Questions such as “How much longer? Must you explain it all? Later began to appreciate the results.

3) While completing the card sort, the subject lay on his back, hands behind head; then shifted to lie on one side with head propped up by one arm. Although excited to find out the colour spectrum, was disappointed that there was work to be done.

4) When first mentioned on the phone, she quickly interrupted me to declare that she thought she was Orange. Just like that!!! Trying to tell her more was of no use. She would not listen and suggested that I go ahead with the assessment before she would even see the cards. When I finally got her to sort the picture cards she visually scanned them quickly and again declared “It’s Orange, I already told you”. When I mentioned that there were several more steps (i.e. other dimensions) she rolled her eyes and grudgingly went through the process. In the end I ended up having to complete the score sheet for her while she demanded to know whether we were done finally and “could we go to that movie now”.  Oh, in the meantime, she also managed to select a colour for me.

M's Face 2011 ParkMichael Tudor M.Ed is a Personality Dimensions® Master Trainer who has been involved with Personality Dimensions® from its inception in 2003. Together with his partner Larry Konyu (also a Personality Dimensions® Master Trainer) he is the author of Differentiated Instruction: Personality Dimensions and Learning Styles and creator of the DVD, The Lighter Side of Talking In Colour.

As president of Kondor Enterprises and a Level 3 Master Trainer, Michael conducts Personality Dimensions® workshops for high schools, universities and the corporate sector. He also leads Level 1 and 2 Personality Dimensions® certification programs about throughout the year.

Visit Michael’s website at www.kondor.ca, or connect with him at michaeltudor@rogers.com.